Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/186056
Title:
The oral academic discourse of international college students.
Author:
Tapper, Joanna.
Issue Date:
1992
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The purpose of this study was to investigate the oral participation of freshman International Students (ISs) in college content classes. The research questions were: (i) how much do ISs speak in different academic situations; (ii) what discourse moves do ISs make, especially initiation moves; and (iii) what are the exchange patterns into which IS discourse moves are organized. The naturally occurring discourse of eight freshman undergraduate ISs studying in a variety of fields was tape-recorded in four academic situations (lectures, laboratory sessions, freshman composition classes, and student/teacher writing conferences). Analysis of the transcripts showed that the amount of IS talk varied across the four situations, and among the eight students. The frequency of student moves also varied among the students and across situations, with student questions the most frequent move in lectures, student offer moves in labs, offered responses in composition classes, and nominated responses in conferences. The most frequent exchange patterns in lectures, labs and conferences were 2-part exchanges, but the 3-part exchange was the most frequent in composition classes. Longer exchange patterns also varied across the situations. The findings contribute to studies in SLA, Interlanguage variation, discourse and interaction analysis. There are also implications for the teaching of English for Academic and Specific Purposes.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Intercultural communication.; Students, Foreign -- Education (Higher); Oral communication.; Communication in education.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
English; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Committee Chair:
Roen, Duane; Johnson, Donna M.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleThe oral academic discourse of international college students.en_US
dc.creatorTapper, Joanna.en_US
dc.contributor.authorTapper, Joanna.en_US
dc.date.issued1992en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe purpose of this study was to investigate the oral participation of freshman International Students (ISs) in college content classes. The research questions were: (i) how much do ISs speak in different academic situations; (ii) what discourse moves do ISs make, especially initiation moves; and (iii) what are the exchange patterns into which IS discourse moves are organized. The naturally occurring discourse of eight freshman undergraduate ISs studying in a variety of fields was tape-recorded in four academic situations (lectures, laboratory sessions, freshman composition classes, and student/teacher writing conferences). Analysis of the transcripts showed that the amount of IS talk varied across the four situations, and among the eight students. The frequency of student moves also varied among the students and across situations, with student questions the most frequent move in lectures, student offer moves in labs, offered responses in composition classes, and nominated responses in conferences. The most frequent exchange patterns in lectures, labs and conferences were 2-part exchanges, but the 3-part exchange was the most frequent in composition classes. Longer exchange patterns also varied across the situations. The findings contribute to studies in SLA, Interlanguage variation, discourse and interaction analysis. There are also implications for the teaching of English for Academic and Specific Purposes.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectIntercultural communication.en_US
dc.subjectStudents, Foreign -- Education (Higher)en_US
dc.subjectOral communication.en_US
dc.subjectCommunication in education.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineEnglishen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.chairRoen, Duaneen_US
dc.contributor.chairJohnson, Donna M.-
dc.contributor.committeememberPhilips, Susan U.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest9309018en_US
dc.identifier.oclc701364143en_US
All Items in UA Campus Repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.