Women's domestic health work in poverty: A comparison of Mexican American and Anglo households.

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/186048
Title:
Women's domestic health work in poverty: A comparison of Mexican American and Anglo households.
Author:
Clark, Lauren.
Issue Date:
1992
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The purpose of this dissertation was to identify the components of women's domestic health work in networks surrounding poor Mexican American and Anglo households and compare women's experiences as domestic health workers. Women representing 10 Mexican American households and 10 Anglo households and their surrounding domestic networks were recruited for this study. Criteria for participation included the presence of at least one child in the household $\le$5 years of age and household income at or below the federally-defined weighted poverty threshold. Sources included, first, 66 interviews with women (n = 26) residing in the study households. Second, women kept 3-week daily health diaries on behalf of all household members. And third, women participated in an inventory of household medications. The study employed several analytic methods, including descriptive statistical analyses, phenomenological insight, taxonomic analyses of women's knowledge structures, life history analysis, thematic analysis, and narrative analyses. The results of the study emphasized several points, including the: (a) gendered but hotly contested nature of domestic responsibility for health, with responsibility negotiated between men and women in households, and disputed between households and social service agencies; (b) significant role played by women's informal networks in defining and evaluating the enactment of maternal responsibility; (c) workings of women's coalitions and cooperatives that protect women's threatened interests and redistribute resources among women; (d) influences governing the transmission of child health and illness knowledge and skills across generations of women; (e) double-edged nature of self-medication that appears as both a source of female autonomy and expertise, yet paradoxically and simultaneously can act as an inappropriate, self-palliating balm for the hurt incurred from inadequate accessibility to quality professional health care for poor women and children; and (f) cross-cutting influences of ethnicity and historical situation in each of the above domains. Women pieced together resources from their cultural background, femaleness, and sometimes their poverty; all these factors also entailed contradictory disadvantages in the production of household health. The health and social policy implications of this study were described in detail in the dissertation, as were the women's own visions for an approximation of utopia.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Family -- Health and hygiene -- United States.; Caregivers -- United States.; Poor -- Health and hygiene -- United States.; Poor -- Medical care -- United States.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Nursing; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Committee Chair:
Kay, Margarita

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleWomen's domestic health work in poverty: A comparison of Mexican American and Anglo households.en_US
dc.creatorClark, Lauren.en_US
dc.contributor.authorClark, Lauren.en_US
dc.date.issued1992en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe purpose of this dissertation was to identify the components of women's domestic health work in networks surrounding poor Mexican American and Anglo households and compare women's experiences as domestic health workers. Women representing 10 Mexican American households and 10 Anglo households and their surrounding domestic networks were recruited for this study. Criteria for participation included the presence of at least one child in the household $\le$5 years of age and household income at or below the federally-defined weighted poverty threshold. Sources included, first, 66 interviews with women (n = 26) residing in the study households. Second, women kept 3-week daily health diaries on behalf of all household members. And third, women participated in an inventory of household medications. The study employed several analytic methods, including descriptive statistical analyses, phenomenological insight, taxonomic analyses of women's knowledge structures, life history analysis, thematic analysis, and narrative analyses. The results of the study emphasized several points, including the: (a) gendered but hotly contested nature of domestic responsibility for health, with responsibility negotiated between men and women in households, and disputed between households and social service agencies; (b) significant role played by women's informal networks in defining and evaluating the enactment of maternal responsibility; (c) workings of women's coalitions and cooperatives that protect women's threatened interests and redistribute resources among women; (d) influences governing the transmission of child health and illness knowledge and skills across generations of women; (e) double-edged nature of self-medication that appears as both a source of female autonomy and expertise, yet paradoxically and simultaneously can act as an inappropriate, self-palliating balm for the hurt incurred from inadequate accessibility to quality professional health care for poor women and children; and (f) cross-cutting influences of ethnicity and historical situation in each of the above domains. Women pieced together resources from their cultural background, femaleness, and sometimes their poverty; all these factors also entailed contradictory disadvantages in the production of household health. The health and social policy implications of this study were described in detail in the dissertation, as were the women's own visions for an approximation of utopia.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectFamily -- Health and hygiene -- United States.en_US
dc.subjectCaregivers -- United States.en_US
dc.subjectPoor -- Health and hygiene -- United States.en_US
dc.subjectPoor -- Medical care -- United States.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineNursingen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.chairKay, Margaritaen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberNichter, Marken_US
dc.contributor.committeememberHoase, Joan E.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberBraden, Carrie Joen_US
dc.identifier.proquest9307707en_US
dc.identifier.oclc701724611en_US
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