THE NINETEENTH CENTURY FANTASTIC SHORT STORY IN ARGENTINA AND URUGUAY.

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/186038
Title:
THE NINETEENTH CENTURY FANTASTIC SHORT STORY IN ARGENTINA AND URUGUAY.
Author:
FREDERICK, BONNIE KATHLEEN.
Issue Date:
1983
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Although the contemporary fantastic short story in Argentina and Uruguay is widely recognized and studied, its origins during the nineteenth century are generally unknown. This study proposes to (1) identify examples of the nineteenth century fantastic, (2) place the works in the context of literary history, and (3) study their narrative conventions and topics. A reading of the nineteenth century fantastic reveals that there is a conventional narrative cluster consisting of three elements: personalized, first-person narrator; frame discourse; and suspended narration. Although there are some variations on this pattern, these conventions generally hold true throughout the nineteenth century. The narrative elements are examined from two perspectives: their contrast with the dominant conventions of realism, and their function within the fantastic. The stories are divided into four categories based on their topic. The first category is the dream fantastic, in which a dream provides self-knowledge or salvation. The second grouping is the fantastic of madness; in these stories, madness can be a divine gift or a destructive force. The third section is the scientific fantastic, in which the scientism of the 1800's is questioned. The final division is the folkloric fantastic, which deals with the supernatural. This study concludes by pointing out that the conventions of the nineteenth century do not continue into the twentieth. The generation of the 20's and 30's formed new concepts of the realistic and the fantastic. Therefore, they altered the previous narrative pattern and abandoned scientism as a literary topic. This study includes stories by these authors: Carlos O. Bunge, Miguel Cané, Macedonio Fernández, Martín García Mérou, Juana Manuela Gorriti, Carlos Guido y Spano, Julio Herrera y Reissig, Eduardo L. Holmberg, William Henry Hudson, Leopoldo Lugones, Carlos Monsalve, Carlos Olivera, Horacio Quiroga, and Eduardo Wilde.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Argentine fiction -- 19th century -- History and criticism.; Uruguayan fiction -- 19th century -- History and criticism.; Fantasy fiction, Argentine -- History and criticism.; Fantasy fiction -- Uruguayan -- History and criticism.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Spanish and Portuguese; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleTHE NINETEENTH CENTURY FANTASTIC SHORT STORY IN ARGENTINA AND URUGUAY.en_US
dc.creatorFREDERICK, BONNIE KATHLEEN.en_US
dc.contributor.authorFREDERICK, BONNIE KATHLEEN.en_US
dc.date.issued1983en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractAlthough the contemporary fantastic short story in Argentina and Uruguay is widely recognized and studied, its origins during the nineteenth century are generally unknown. This study proposes to (1) identify examples of the nineteenth century fantastic, (2) place the works in the context of literary history, and (3) study their narrative conventions and topics. A reading of the nineteenth century fantastic reveals that there is a conventional narrative cluster consisting of three elements: personalized, first-person narrator; frame discourse; and suspended narration. Although there are some variations on this pattern, these conventions generally hold true throughout the nineteenth century. The narrative elements are examined from two perspectives: their contrast with the dominant conventions of realism, and their function within the fantastic. The stories are divided into four categories based on their topic. The first category is the dream fantastic, in which a dream provides self-knowledge or salvation. The second grouping is the fantastic of madness; in these stories, madness can be a divine gift or a destructive force. The third section is the scientific fantastic, in which the scientism of the 1800's is questioned. The final division is the folkloric fantastic, which deals with the supernatural. This study concludes by pointing out that the conventions of the nineteenth century do not continue into the twentieth. The generation of the 20's and 30's formed new concepts of the realistic and the fantastic. Therefore, they altered the previous narrative pattern and abandoned scientism as a literary topic. This study includes stories by these authors: Carlos O. Bunge, Miguel Cané, Macedonio Fernández, Martín García Mérou, Juana Manuela Gorriti, Carlos Guido y Spano, Julio Herrera y Reissig, Eduardo L. Holmberg, William Henry Hudson, Leopoldo Lugones, Carlos Monsalve, Carlos Olivera, Horacio Quiroga, and Eduardo Wilde.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectArgentine fiction -- 19th century -- History and criticism.en_US
dc.subjectUruguayan fiction -- 19th century -- History and criticism.en_US
dc.subjectFantasy fiction, Argentine -- History and criticism.en_US
dc.subjectFantasy fiction -- Uruguayan -- History and criticism.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineSpanish and Portugueseen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.identifier.proquest8315284en_US
dc.identifier.oclc688622379en_US
All Items in UA Campus Repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.