Linguistic markers of association as persuasive devices in mediated appeals.

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/186033
Title:
Linguistic markers of association as persuasive devices in mediated appeals.
Author:
Hall, John Robert
Issue Date:
1992
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The framework developed and tested in this study argues that the success of mediated persuasive appeals can be partially explained by the interaction among linguistic and extra-linguistic variables. It was predicted that sources would be most persuasive when the topic was of little importance and the source was liked by the viewer and that sources using intense language would be evaluated as believing the arguments presented more than sources using less intense language. These predictions were supported. The study also supported a predicted interaction between familiarity and liking such that familiarity works to the advantage of liked sources and to the disadvantage of disliked sources. It was also posited that intensity would have a differentially effective role for liked and disliked sources such that it works to the advantage of liked sources and to the disadvantage of disliked sources. This hypothesis was solely supported in proattitudinal appeals when intensity was operationalized using structural criteria and in counterattitudinal appeals when intensity was operationalized as perceived by the viewer. Finally, a 3-way interaction was predicted suggesting that familiarity and intensity would combine such that high familiarity results in increases in attitude change with the use of language that is more intense than expected for liked sources and decreases in attitude change for disliked sources. This hypothesis was not supported. In fact, both highly familiar sources benefited from use of language that was less intense than expected.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Dissertations, Academic.; Paralinguistics.; Communication.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Communication; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Committee Chair:
Burgoon, H. Michael

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleLinguistic markers of association as persuasive devices in mediated appeals.en_US
dc.creatorHall, John Roberten_US
dc.contributor.authorHall, John Roberten_US
dc.date.issued1992en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe framework developed and tested in this study argues that the success of mediated persuasive appeals can be partially explained by the interaction among linguistic and extra-linguistic variables. It was predicted that sources would be most persuasive when the topic was of little importance and the source was liked by the viewer and that sources using intense language would be evaluated as believing the arguments presented more than sources using less intense language. These predictions were supported. The study also supported a predicted interaction between familiarity and liking such that familiarity works to the advantage of liked sources and to the disadvantage of disliked sources. It was also posited that intensity would have a differentially effective role for liked and disliked sources such that it works to the advantage of liked sources and to the disadvantage of disliked sources. This hypothesis was solely supported in proattitudinal appeals when intensity was operationalized using structural criteria and in counterattitudinal appeals when intensity was operationalized as perceived by the viewer. Finally, a 3-way interaction was predicted suggesting that familiarity and intensity would combine such that high familiarity results in increases in attitude change with the use of language that is more intense than expected for liked sources and decreases in attitude change for disliked sources. This hypothesis was not supported. In fact, both highly familiar sources benefited from use of language that was less intense than expected.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectDissertations, Academic.en_US
dc.subjectParalinguistics.en_US
dc.subjectCommunication.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineCommunicationen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.chairBurgoon, H. Michaelen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberBurgoon, Judee K.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberBuller, David B.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberAleamoni, Lawrence M.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberBrainerd, Charles J.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest9307693en_US
dc.identifier.oclc713365794en_US
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