Antecedents and consequences of competitive intelligence: Conceptual framework and empirical evidence.

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/186024
Title:
Antecedents and consequences of competitive intelligence: Conceptual framework and empirical evidence.
Author:
Wee, Liang Chee.
Issue Date:
1992
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
This dissertation develops a conceptual framework that includes the component parts of competitive intelligence (CI) activities, the antecedents of CI, and the bottom-line benefits of CI activities. Specifically, a five-phase CI process was constructed that included recognition, prioritization, collection, interpretation, and utilization. Antecedents included turbulence and competitiveness in the business environment, the use of information technology (IT) tools, and the dynamics and attributes of the strategic business unit (SBU). Also, we postulated that CI activities would predict an SBU's knowledge of the business environment, an SBU's relations with external constituents, relations within an SBU, an SBU's business performance, and an SBU's confidence in its strategic plans. The findings indicated that CI champion(s) and top management's support are very strong predictors of CI activities. In terms of tangible benefits, the study indicated that CI activities predict an SBU's knowledge of the external business environment, relations within an SBU, and product quality. In turn, an SBU's knowledge of the external business environment and product quality predict the SBU's business performance. Also, product quality and relations within an SBU predict an SBU's confidence in its strategic plans which in turn predicts an SBU's relations with its external constituents. In terms of managerial implications, this study provides very clear evidence of the benefits of CI activities. Furthermore, we found evidence of three key mediating variables; namely, an SBU's knowledge of its external business environment, relations within an SBU, and product quality. The results of this study provides very strong support for organizational efforts to improve CI activities. Moreover, of interest in an era of tight budgets is this study's providing solid evidence that CI is not a tangential activity to be supported only in good financial times. Rather, it is a basic intelligence activity that can facilitate the bottom-line performance of an SBU.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Dissertations, Academic.; Business intelligence.; Management.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Business Administration; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Committee Chair:
Jaworski, Bernard J.; Nunamaker, Jay F.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleAntecedents and consequences of competitive intelligence: Conceptual framework and empirical evidence.en_US
dc.creatorWee, Liang Chee.en_US
dc.contributor.authorWee, Liang Chee.en_US
dc.date.issued1992en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis dissertation develops a conceptual framework that includes the component parts of competitive intelligence (CI) activities, the antecedents of CI, and the bottom-line benefits of CI activities. Specifically, a five-phase CI process was constructed that included recognition, prioritization, collection, interpretation, and utilization. Antecedents included turbulence and competitiveness in the business environment, the use of information technology (IT) tools, and the dynamics and attributes of the strategic business unit (SBU). Also, we postulated that CI activities would predict an SBU's knowledge of the business environment, an SBU's relations with external constituents, relations within an SBU, an SBU's business performance, and an SBU's confidence in its strategic plans. The findings indicated that CI champion(s) and top management's support are very strong predictors of CI activities. In terms of tangible benefits, the study indicated that CI activities predict an SBU's knowledge of the external business environment, relations within an SBU, and product quality. In turn, an SBU's knowledge of the external business environment and product quality predict the SBU's business performance. Also, product quality and relations within an SBU predict an SBU's confidence in its strategic plans which in turn predicts an SBU's relations with its external constituents. In terms of managerial implications, this study provides very clear evidence of the benefits of CI activities. Furthermore, we found evidence of three key mediating variables; namely, an SBU's knowledge of its external business environment, relations within an SBU, and product quality. The results of this study provides very strong support for organizational efforts to improve CI activities. Moreover, of interest in an era of tight budgets is this study's providing solid evidence that CI is not a tangential activity to be supported only in good financial times. Rather, it is a basic intelligence activity that can facilitate the bottom-line performance of an SBU.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectDissertations, Academic.en_US
dc.subjectBusiness intelligence.en_US
dc.subjectManagement.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineBusiness Administrationen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.chairJaworski, Bernard J.en_US
dc.contributor.chairNunamaker, Jay F.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberVogel, Douglas R.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest9307684en_US
dc.identifier.oclc713358763en_US
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