A test of the relation between audit technology and the development of expertise.

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/186013
Title:
A test of the relation between audit technology and the development of expertise.
Author:
Myers, Marla Ann.
Issue Date:
1992
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The approach typically taken in expertise research has used audit experience as an expertise surrogate, but the nature of "experience" varies among auditors and among firms. One systematic difference in an auditor's experience is the level of "structure" incorporated into the employing firm's audit process. The schemata developed through experience with a structured audit technology may differ from an unstructured technology. It is hypothesized that when performing a task in a "typical" audit situation, auditors experienced with a more structured audit technology will demonstrate higher audit effectiveness compared with auditors who receive less structured audit technology experience. On the other hand, in "atypical" audit situations it is hypothesized that the unstructured firm's experienced auditors will perform better. The experiment used auditors from two Big Six accounting firms: a structured firm and an unstructured firm. The experimental task consisted of two cases. The "atypical" audit case was identical to the typical case except for the inclusion of fraudulent sales. The results support the prediction that in atypical audit situations experienced auditors from unstructured firms perform better than experienced auditors from structured firms. The results indicate that structured firms should consider developing training programs and procedures to ensure that auditors have compensating learning experiences and to provide quality audit service.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Business.; Accounting.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Business Administration; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Committee Chair:
Mutchler, Jane F.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleA test of the relation between audit technology and the development of expertise.en_US
dc.creatorMyers, Marla Ann.en_US
dc.contributor.authorMyers, Marla Ann.en_US
dc.date.issued1992en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe approach typically taken in expertise research has used audit experience as an expertise surrogate, but the nature of "experience" varies among auditors and among firms. One systematic difference in an auditor's experience is the level of "structure" incorporated into the employing firm's audit process. The schemata developed through experience with a structured audit technology may differ from an unstructured technology. It is hypothesized that when performing a task in a "typical" audit situation, auditors experienced with a more structured audit technology will demonstrate higher audit effectiveness compared with auditors who receive less structured audit technology experience. On the other hand, in "atypical" audit situations it is hypothesized that the unstructured firm's experienced auditors will perform better. The experiment used auditors from two Big Six accounting firms: a structured firm and an unstructured firm. The experimental task consisted of two cases. The "atypical" audit case was identical to the typical case except for the inclusion of fraudulent sales. The results support the prediction that in atypical audit situations experienced auditors from unstructured firms perform better than experienced auditors from structured firms. The results indicate that structured firms should consider developing training programs and procedures to ensure that auditors have compensating learning experiences and to provide quality audit service.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectBusiness.en_US
dc.subjectAccounting.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineBusiness Administrationen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.chairMutchler, Jane F.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberFelix, Jr., William L.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberSchatzberg, Jeffreyen_US
dc.identifier.proquest9307676en_US
dc.identifier.oclc701105656en_US
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