The operating impact of increased parts commonality on a manufacturing firm using MRP.

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/186011
Title:
The operating impact of increased parts commonality on a manufacturing firm using MRP.
Author:
Parmenter, David Alan
Issue Date:
1992
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
A simulation model is used to investigate the impact of increased parts commonality on the operating characteristics of a manufacturing firm using MRP. To enable increased generalization about commonality, its impact is studied under a variety of environmental conditions. These conditions are defined by operational factors which manipulate end item demand patterns, setup time, lot sizing method, and the degree to which overall plant processing requirements are disaggregated and allocated to separate work centers. The manufacturing performance measures used, such as average processing time and standard deviation of processing time, focus on capacity requirements. A new measure, system disruption, is introduced. This measure focuses attention on the resource reallocation which may be required with the institution of increased commonality. The results demonstrate that increased commonality can in some cases lead to the beneficial effect of a sizable reduction in average processing time without necessarily being accompanied by an increase in workload variability. The results also show that it is very important to consider the impact of increased commonality on an individual work center basis as well as on the plant-wide basis, since workload may be redistributed from work center to work center by the institution of commonality. Previous commonality studies have generally shown that increased commonality will usually lead to the detrimental effect of an increase in period to period workload variability. This study demonstrates that such is not always the case. In fact, a strategic institution of commonality in order to totally eliminate the processing requirements for certain work centers may actually allow a decrease in workload variability.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Manufacturing resource planning.; Design, Industrial.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Business Administration; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Committee Chair:
Aquilano, Nicholas J.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleThe operating impact of increased parts commonality on a manufacturing firm using MRP.en_US
dc.creatorParmenter, David Alanen_US
dc.contributor.authorParmenter, David Alanen_US
dc.date.issued1992en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractA simulation model is used to investigate the impact of increased parts commonality on the operating characteristics of a manufacturing firm using MRP. To enable increased generalization about commonality, its impact is studied under a variety of environmental conditions. These conditions are defined by operational factors which manipulate end item demand patterns, setup time, lot sizing method, and the degree to which overall plant processing requirements are disaggregated and allocated to separate work centers. The manufacturing performance measures used, such as average processing time and standard deviation of processing time, focus on capacity requirements. A new measure, system disruption, is introduced. This measure focuses attention on the resource reallocation which may be required with the institution of increased commonality. The results demonstrate that increased commonality can in some cases lead to the beneficial effect of a sizable reduction in average processing time without necessarily being accompanied by an increase in workload variability. The results also show that it is very important to consider the impact of increased commonality on an individual work center basis as well as on the plant-wide basis, since workload may be redistributed from work center to work center by the institution of commonality. Previous commonality studies have generally shown that increased commonality will usually lead to the detrimental effect of an increase in period to period workload variability. This study demonstrates that such is not always the case. In fact, a strategic institution of commonality in order to totally eliminate the processing requirements for certain work centers may actually allow a decrease in workload variability.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectManufacturing resource planning.en_US
dc.subjectDesign, Industrial.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineBusiness Administrationen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.chairAquilano, Nicholas J.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberSanchez, Susanen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberVakharia, Asooen_US
dc.identifier.proquest9307674en_US
dc.identifier.oclc703158396en_US
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