Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/186010
Title:
Impact of diarrhea on growth velocity in Egyptian infants.
Author:
Zaghloul, Sahar Saad.
Issue Date:
1992
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Weight velocity of 34 Egyptian infants aged two to thirteen months was examined before, during, and after 43 diarrheal episodes. The study was conducted in Bolaq El Dakrour, a poor neighborhood in metropolitan Cairo, during the summer of 1990. Weight measurements, food intake, morbidity, and socio-demographic-economic-sanitary data were collected. Diarrhea was reported according to mothers' definitions. A local reference population was constructed based on the criteria that: infants were from the same neighborhood, of the same age and sex, and were reported diarrhea-free when study infants were reported sick. Weight velocity during diarrheal episodes was 16 g/d lower than before illness and 15 g/d lower than reference infants. One-month post-illness weight velocity was similar to pre-illness weight velocity, with no evidence of catch-up growth. Illness severity indices, namely the number of symptoms or illnesses experienced, number of stools/day, and presence of blood in stool were strong predictors of velocity during and one-month post-illness. Breastfeeding had a positive influence on weight velocity during illness. Consumption of rice, macaroni and vegetables was negatively associated with weight velocity during and one month after illness. Weight gain in the month following the episode was positively associated with a higher level of formal education and occupation of fathers, negatively with the presence of adults above 50 years of age in the household, and a greater age difference between the parents. Percent of time sick with fever had a negative impact on long-term weight velocity. Thus in this population, the effect of diarrhea on weight gain velocity is transient, catch-up growth does not occur, and infants fed solid food suffer the most weight loss. Thus, it is possible that effective nutritional intervention will reduce growth faltering.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Dissertations, Academic.; Children -- Growth.; Infants -- Nutrition.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Nutritional Sciences; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Committee Chair:
Harrison, Gail G.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleImpact of diarrhea on growth velocity in Egyptian infants.en_US
dc.creatorZaghloul, Sahar Saad.en_US
dc.contributor.authorZaghloul, Sahar Saad.en_US
dc.date.issued1992en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractWeight velocity of 34 Egyptian infants aged two to thirteen months was examined before, during, and after 43 diarrheal episodes. The study was conducted in Bolaq El Dakrour, a poor neighborhood in metropolitan Cairo, during the summer of 1990. Weight measurements, food intake, morbidity, and socio-demographic-economic-sanitary data were collected. Diarrhea was reported according to mothers' definitions. A local reference population was constructed based on the criteria that: infants were from the same neighborhood, of the same age and sex, and were reported diarrhea-free when study infants were reported sick. Weight velocity during diarrheal episodes was 16 g/d lower than before illness and 15 g/d lower than reference infants. One-month post-illness weight velocity was similar to pre-illness weight velocity, with no evidence of catch-up growth. Illness severity indices, namely the number of symptoms or illnesses experienced, number of stools/day, and presence of blood in stool were strong predictors of velocity during and one-month post-illness. Breastfeeding had a positive influence on weight velocity during illness. Consumption of rice, macaroni and vegetables was negatively associated with weight velocity during and one month after illness. Weight gain in the month following the episode was positively associated with a higher level of formal education and occupation of fathers, negatively with the presence of adults above 50 years of age in the household, and a greater age difference between the parents. Percent of time sick with fever had a negative impact on long-term weight velocity. Thus in this population, the effect of diarrhea on weight gain velocity is transient, catch-up growth does not occur, and infants fed solid food suffer the most weight loss. Thus, it is possible that effective nutritional intervention will reduce growth faltering.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectDissertations, Academic.en_US
dc.subjectChildren -- Growth.en_US
dc.subjectInfants -- Nutrition.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineNutritional Sciencesen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.chairHarrison, Gail G.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberBrannon, Patsy M.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberGalal, Osman M.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberStini, William A.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberNichter, Mark A.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest9307673en_US
dc.identifier.oclc713904557en_US
All Items in UA Campus Repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.