Post-high school adjustments of special education and regular education students from the Apache reservation: A five year follow-up study.

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/186009
Title:
Post-high school adjustments of special education and regular education students from the Apache reservation: A five year follow-up study.
Author:
Rangasamy, Ramasamy.
Issue Date:
1992
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The purpose of this study was to describe and compare the post-school adjustment of Native American youth who received special education or regular education services on White Mountain Apache Indian reservation in Arizona. This study reflects what the students have been doing since they left school, whether their school experiences have prepared them for life in general, and how their personal history helps identify their values, outlooks, and current community standing. In an effort to assess the transition status of these former students, a 38 item survey instrument was developed. A total of 132 students were identified from the Alchesay high school records. Of this number, face-to-face interviews were conducted with 106 former (80%) students. Students were compared in five areas which have been identified as important to successful transition from school to adult life. Comparisons were made on the respondents opinions of their secondary school education, employment status, independent living, maladjustment, and culture/traditionality. SES stated that mathematics, resource programs, and English prepared them for the job market whereas mathematics, office skills, science, and business education were selected by the RES. All the respondents wished for computer education. Only 31% of the total sample was employed up to five years after leaving school. Seventy-four percent of the students still live with their parents. Forty-four percent of both groups had arrest records, and 68% of both groups had a history of substance abuse. Sixty-four percent of the respondents use and speak the Apache language most of the time. Parents and the extended family provide the majority of guidance and support as these young adults seek employment, community integration and social adjustment. There is a pressing need for transitional programs, better job programs, and substance abuse preventive programs for both groups of Apache post-high school students.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Indians of North America -- Education -- Arizona.; Apache Indians.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Special Education and Rehabilitation; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Committee Chair:
Umbreit, John

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titlePost-high school adjustments of special education and regular education students from the Apache reservation: A five year follow-up study.en_US
dc.creatorRangasamy, Ramasamy.en_US
dc.contributor.authorRangasamy, Ramasamy.en_US
dc.date.issued1992en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe purpose of this study was to describe and compare the post-school adjustment of Native American youth who received special education or regular education services on White Mountain Apache Indian reservation in Arizona. This study reflects what the students have been doing since they left school, whether their school experiences have prepared them for life in general, and how their personal history helps identify their values, outlooks, and current community standing. In an effort to assess the transition status of these former students, a 38 item survey instrument was developed. A total of 132 students were identified from the Alchesay high school records. Of this number, face-to-face interviews were conducted with 106 former (80%) students. Students were compared in five areas which have been identified as important to successful transition from school to adult life. Comparisons were made on the respondents opinions of their secondary school education, employment status, independent living, maladjustment, and culture/traditionality. SES stated that mathematics, resource programs, and English prepared them for the job market whereas mathematics, office skills, science, and business education were selected by the RES. All the respondents wished for computer education. Only 31% of the total sample was employed up to five years after leaving school. Seventy-four percent of the students still live with their parents. Forty-four percent of both groups had arrest records, and 68% of both groups had a history of substance abuse. Sixty-four percent of the respondents use and speak the Apache language most of the time. Parents and the extended family provide the majority of guidance and support as these young adults seek employment, community integration and social adjustment. There is a pressing need for transitional programs, better job programs, and substance abuse preventive programs for both groups of Apache post-high school students.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectIndians of North America -- Education -- Arizona.en_US
dc.subjectApache Indians.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineSpecial Education and Rehabilitationen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.chairUmbreit, Johnen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberShafer, Michaelen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberJoe, Jennieen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberSales, Amosen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberChalfant, Jamesen_US
dc.identifier.proquest9307672en_US
dc.identifier.oclc701927562en_US
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