Teotihuacan and the Gulf Coast: Ceramic evidence for contact and interactional relationships.

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/186001
Title:
Teotihuacan and the Gulf Coast: Ceramic evidence for contact and interactional relationships.
Author:
Yarborough, Clare McJimsey.
Issue Date:
1992
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Teotihuacan was founded in a side valley of the Basin of Mexico during the first centuries of the common era and at its height reached a size of approximately 20 square kilometers. During A. D. 400-700, the Middle Classic period, architecture and portable artifacts in the Teotihuacan style are distributed throughout Mesoamerica. The distribution of Teotihuacan style material culture is often cited as evidence that Teotihuacan had the social and political complexity characteristic of early expansionistic states, and was in fact the first empire of highland Mexico. This study traces patterns of Teotihuacan influence in Gulf Coast ceramic assemblages in order to reconstruct relationships between Teotihuacan and various Classic period Gulf Coast polities. Here influence is defined as all archaeological indications of contact between two culturally or ethnically distinct populations. Variation in the timing and patterning of influence indicates variation in the nature of the relationships sustained between the two populations. To control for temporal and geographic variation, ceramic sequences and assemblage descriptions currently in use both at Teotihuacan and on the Gulf Coast are discussed and evaluated. Patterns of Teotihuacan influence in the ceramic assemblages of the Gulf Coast are shown to vary considerably from area to area and reflect clear differences in the timing and duration of Teotihuacan contact. Variation also occurs in the fidelity with which local imitations adhere to Teotihuacan stylistic conventions, the depositional context in which Teotihuacan imitations occur, and the range and types of Teotihuacan ceramic artifacts copied. The resulting patterns are interpreted to be meaningful in terms of past relationships between Teotihuacan and various Gulf Coast polities. The existence of Teotihuacan imperial control over part of the Gulf Coast is suggested.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Teotihuacán Site (San Juan Teotihuacán, Mexico); Indians of Mexico -- Commerce.; Indian pottery -- Mexico -- Social aspects.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Anthropology; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Committee Chair:
Culbert, T. Patrick

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleTeotihuacan and the Gulf Coast: Ceramic evidence for contact and interactional relationships.en_US
dc.creatorYarborough, Clare McJimsey.en_US
dc.contributor.authorYarborough, Clare McJimsey.en_US
dc.date.issued1992en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractTeotihuacan was founded in a side valley of the Basin of Mexico during the first centuries of the common era and at its height reached a size of approximately 20 square kilometers. During A. D. 400-700, the Middle Classic period, architecture and portable artifacts in the Teotihuacan style are distributed throughout Mesoamerica. The distribution of Teotihuacan style material culture is often cited as evidence that Teotihuacan had the social and political complexity characteristic of early expansionistic states, and was in fact the first empire of highland Mexico. This study traces patterns of Teotihuacan influence in Gulf Coast ceramic assemblages in order to reconstruct relationships between Teotihuacan and various Classic period Gulf Coast polities. Here influence is defined as all archaeological indications of contact between two culturally or ethnically distinct populations. Variation in the timing and patterning of influence indicates variation in the nature of the relationships sustained between the two populations. To control for temporal and geographic variation, ceramic sequences and assemblage descriptions currently in use both at Teotihuacan and on the Gulf Coast are discussed and evaluated. Patterns of Teotihuacan influence in the ceramic assemblages of the Gulf Coast are shown to vary considerably from area to area and reflect clear differences in the timing and duration of Teotihuacan contact. Variation also occurs in the fidelity with which local imitations adhere to Teotihuacan stylistic conventions, the depositional context in which Teotihuacan imitations occur, and the range and types of Teotihuacan ceramic artifacts copied. The resulting patterns are interpreted to be meaningful in terms of past relationships between Teotihuacan and various Gulf Coast polities. The existence of Teotihuacan imperial control over part of the Gulf Coast is suggested.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectTeotihuacán Site (San Juan Teotihuacán, Mexico)en_US
dc.subjectIndians of Mexico -- Commerce.en_US
dc.subjectIndian pottery -- Mexico -- Social aspects.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineAnthropologyen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.chairCulbert, T. Patricken_US
dc.contributor.committeememberStark, Barbara L.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberReid, J. Jeffersonen_US
dc.identifier.proquest9307665en_US
dc.identifier.oclc704283062en_US
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