Integrating special education students into the regular classroom: An investigation and analysis of principal and teacher attitudes.

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/185984
Title:
Integrating special education students into the regular classroom: An investigation and analysis of principal and teacher attitudes.
Author:
Arrington, Linda Ruth.
Issue Date:
1992
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The purpose of this study was to examine the attitudes among elementary principals and regular education teachers in Tucson, Arizona schools regarding perceptions of (1) what principals and teachers perceive as requirements for successful classroom integration of special education students; and (2) principals' and teachers' perception about the potential for student success in integrated, partially integrated, and non-integrated classroom settings. The study elicited responses from 117 principals and teachers during the 1992 school year. A survey instrument was used to obtain information from principals and teachers regarding their opinions on 18 items that have implications for integrating special education students into the regular classroom. Principals and teachers were also asked to indicate their level of support for integrating special education students into the regular classroom. Statistical analysis revealed significant differences among principals and teachers regarding their support of integrating special education students into the regular classroom setting; integration would not be in the best interest of all students; integration requires a change in the attitudes of principals and regular education personnel; and that educational programs should be delivered to handicapped students primarily by special educators outside the regular classroom. Most principals indicated that the majority of regular classroom teachers in their school are able to provide an appropriate education for any student without the assistance of a special educator. While principals and teachers support the inclusion of most students with handicapping conditions in general education classes, some respondents questioned the appropriateness of extending the regular class placement option to students with severe disabilities. Significant differences were found with regard to additional background and training associated with how principals and teachers view their success in educating special education students in the regular classroom. Results of this study hold implications for policy makers, researchers, regular and special education teachers, and administrators.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Mainstreaming in education.; Teachers -- Attitudes.; School principals -- Attitudes.; Children with disabilities -- Education.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Educational Administration and Higher Education; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Committee Chair:
Heckman, Paul E.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleIntegrating special education students into the regular classroom: An investigation and analysis of principal and teacher attitudes.en_US
dc.creatorArrington, Linda Ruth.en_US
dc.contributor.authorArrington, Linda Ruth.en_US
dc.date.issued1992en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe purpose of this study was to examine the attitudes among elementary principals and regular education teachers in Tucson, Arizona schools regarding perceptions of (1) what principals and teachers perceive as requirements for successful classroom integration of special education students; and (2) principals' and teachers' perception about the potential for student success in integrated, partially integrated, and non-integrated classroom settings. The study elicited responses from 117 principals and teachers during the 1992 school year. A survey instrument was used to obtain information from principals and teachers regarding their opinions on 18 items that have implications for integrating special education students into the regular classroom. Principals and teachers were also asked to indicate their level of support for integrating special education students into the regular classroom. Statistical analysis revealed significant differences among principals and teachers regarding their support of integrating special education students into the regular classroom setting; integration would not be in the best interest of all students; integration requires a change in the attitudes of principals and regular education personnel; and that educational programs should be delivered to handicapped students primarily by special educators outside the regular classroom. Most principals indicated that the majority of regular classroom teachers in their school are able to provide an appropriate education for any student without the assistance of a special educator. While principals and teachers support the inclusion of most students with handicapping conditions in general education classes, some respondents questioned the appropriateness of extending the regular class placement option to students with severe disabilities. Significant differences were found with regard to additional background and training associated with how principals and teachers view their success in educating special education students in the regular classroom. Results of this study hold implications for policy makers, researchers, regular and special education teachers, and administrators.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectMainstreaming in education.en_US
dc.subjectTeachers -- Attitudes.en_US
dc.subjectSchool principals -- Attitudes.en_US
dc.subjectChildren with disabilities -- Education.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineEducational Administration and Higher Educationen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.chairHeckman, Paul E.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberNelson, L. O.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberConley, Sharonen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberSacken, Michaelen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberGrant, Roberten_US
dc.contributor.committeememberMedina, Marcelloen_US
dc.identifier.proquest9307649en_US
dc.identifier.oclc705386370en_US
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