Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/185979
Title:
My thinking chair: Daydreaming in the lives of children.
Author:
Hanson, Geane Renee.
Issue Date:
1992
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
This dissertation is an exploration of the nature of daydreaming and its relationship to literacy development in the lives of four children. The children were interviewed and the data is presented in four interpretive case studies. Of the four children, ages 11-13, two of the children are urban and two children live on a southwestern Indian reservation. Five themes emerged from the interviews with the children regarding their use and description of daydreaming: daydreaming, imagination, reading, writing, and school. The children consistently made distinctions between daydreaming and imagination, utilized daydreaming in their construction of their worlds, and discussed the negative attitude they experience in school toward daydreaming. The data in the individual case studies is contextualized within the broader life context of each of the four children represented. A component of this work is based in the researcher's self reflection. The universal practice of daydreaming must be valued in the growth and development of the individual. Daydreams show the uniqueness of individual invention. Through daydreams children explore places they have never been, become characters in the stories they read, and explore new knowledge in the safety of their own minds. Daydreaming is an invisible aspect of the creative and generative life of the mind which is critical to visible production. Currently research themes are increasingly addressing the question of individual consciousness and understanding how children transform information into their own terms. This dissertation seeks to contribute to this understanding. Daydreaming is not a negative practice but one which contributes to children's invisible and visible worlds. Daydreaming serves the interests of these children in their lives as thinkers, readers, writers and creators both at home and school.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Dissertations, Academic.; Child psychology -- Case studies.; Educational psychology -- Case studies.; Literacy.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Language, Reading and Culture; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Committee Chair:
Goodman, Kenneth

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleMy thinking chair: Daydreaming in the lives of children.en_US
dc.creatorHanson, Geane Renee.en_US
dc.contributor.authorHanson, Geane Renee.en_US
dc.date.issued1992en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis dissertation is an exploration of the nature of daydreaming and its relationship to literacy development in the lives of four children. The children were interviewed and the data is presented in four interpretive case studies. Of the four children, ages 11-13, two of the children are urban and two children live on a southwestern Indian reservation. Five themes emerged from the interviews with the children regarding their use and description of daydreaming: daydreaming, imagination, reading, writing, and school. The children consistently made distinctions between daydreaming and imagination, utilized daydreaming in their construction of their worlds, and discussed the negative attitude they experience in school toward daydreaming. The data in the individual case studies is contextualized within the broader life context of each of the four children represented. A component of this work is based in the researcher's self reflection. The universal practice of daydreaming must be valued in the growth and development of the individual. Daydreams show the uniqueness of individual invention. Through daydreams children explore places they have never been, become characters in the stories they read, and explore new knowledge in the safety of their own minds. Daydreaming is an invisible aspect of the creative and generative life of the mind which is critical to visible production. Currently research themes are increasingly addressing the question of individual consciousness and understanding how children transform information into their own terms. This dissertation seeks to contribute to this understanding. Daydreaming is not a negative practice but one which contributes to children's invisible and visible worlds. Daydreaming serves the interests of these children in their lives as thinkers, readers, writers and creators both at home and school.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectDissertations, Academic.en_US
dc.subjectChild psychology -- Case studies.en_US
dc.subjectEducational psychology -- Case studies.en_US
dc.subjectLiteracy.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineLanguage, Reading and Cultureen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.chairGoodman, Kennethen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberGoodman, Yetta M.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberMoll, Luis C.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberMcCarty, Teresaen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberSekaquaptewa, Emoryen_US
dc.identifier.proquest9307645en_US
dc.identifier.oclc713358586en_US
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