The ontogeny and evolution of sexual dimorphism in paraclinin blennies (Teleostei: Labrisomidae).

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/185973
Title:
The ontogeny and evolution of sexual dimorphism in paraclinin blennies (Teleostei: Labrisomidae).
Author:
Brooks, Meriel Judith.
Issue Date:
1992
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Ontogeny of sexual dimorphism within the Paraclinini is quite complex both within and among species. Differential growth in males is not the main cause of adult dimorphism. Rather, allometric shifts in both sexes produce adult shapes with approximately equal frequency. A trait that appears exaggerated in one sex is not always produced ontogenetically by acceleration in growth of that trait. Larger male head size, for example, may result from neoteny in females (relative to juveniles) as often as acceleration in male growth. Females, rather than looking like large juveniles, are actually more different in shape from juveniles than are males. On this time scale then, females should be considered the divergent sex. Phylogenetic analysis revealed three main lineages within the tribe. These groups are probably stable, though positions of some of the other species may change as more data become available. The most primitive species are grandicomis, nigripinnis, and cingulatus. The position of Exerpes within the clade indicates that its single species should be included in the genus Paraclinus. Fairly extreme sexual dimorphism within Paraclinini seems to be the ancestral condition and has been variously modified within the clade. The trend is toward less extreme male and female difference with occasional reversal of a dimorphic character. The decrease in amount of dimorphism seems to have occurred primarily through neoteny (relative to ancestral allometry), acceleration, and post-displacement. Juvenile growth has also changed relative to ancestral juveniles, affecting of adult as well as juvenile proportions. These evolutionary changes are independent of and in no way reflect the ontogenetic paths producing dimorphism within a species.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Clinidae.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Ecology and Evolutionary Biology; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Committee Chair:
Strauss, Richard E.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleThe ontogeny and evolution of sexual dimorphism in paraclinin blennies (Teleostei: Labrisomidae).en_US
dc.creatorBrooks, Meriel Judith.en_US
dc.contributor.authorBrooks, Meriel Judith.en_US
dc.date.issued1992en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractOntogeny of sexual dimorphism within the Paraclinini is quite complex both within and among species. Differential growth in males is not the main cause of adult dimorphism. Rather, allometric shifts in both sexes produce adult shapes with approximately equal frequency. A trait that appears exaggerated in one sex is not always produced ontogenetically by acceleration in growth of that trait. Larger male head size, for example, may result from neoteny in females (relative to juveniles) as often as acceleration in male growth. Females, rather than looking like large juveniles, are actually more different in shape from juveniles than are males. On this time scale then, females should be considered the divergent sex. Phylogenetic analysis revealed three main lineages within the tribe. These groups are probably stable, though positions of some of the other species may change as more data become available. The most primitive species are grandicomis, nigripinnis, and cingulatus. The position of Exerpes within the clade indicates that its single species should be included in the genus Paraclinus. Fairly extreme sexual dimorphism within Paraclinini seems to be the ancestral condition and has been variously modified within the clade. The trend is toward less extreme male and female difference with occasional reversal of a dimorphic character. The decrease in amount of dimorphism seems to have occurred primarily through neoteny (relative to ancestral allometry), acceleration, and post-displacement. Juvenile growth has also changed relative to ancestral juveniles, affecting of adult as well as juvenile proportions. These evolutionary changes are independent of and in no way reflect the ontogenetic paths producing dimorphism within a species.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectClinidae.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineEcology and Evolutionary Biologyen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.chairStrauss, Richard E.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberVleck, Daviden_US
dc.contributor.committeememberSmith, Roberten_US
dc.identifier.proquest9303315en_US
dc.identifier.oclc701727435en_US
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