Domain-specific learning: A neuropsychological rehabilitation investigation of vanishing cues.

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/185956
Title:
Domain-specific learning: A neuropsychological rehabilitation investigation of vanishing cues.
Author:
Cotgageorge, Ed.
Issue Date:
1992
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
This project represents a descriptive study of 19 neurologically impaired adults. The etiology of the impairment includes traumatic brain injury and progressive neurological disease such as Alzheimer's Disease. Four non-impaired geriatric adults were controls for the Alzheimer's Disease patients in this study. Subjects in the study were taught, through the method of vanishing cues, information about computer operating system commands and computer programming. The primary purpose of this project was to determine whether or not these groups could acquire this information and determine the extent to which memory and attention deficits contribute to learning new information in neurologically impaired individuals. Subjects participated in learning sessions presented by a microcomputer. The sessions lasted for twenty minutes to one hour, depending on the subjects ability to attend to the task. Each subject interacted with the computer by answering the questions or doing the procedures presented. Not all of the subjects reached the criteria of zero or one hints that are required before moving on to the next lesson. None of the subjects with progressive neurological disease completed any of the lessons. Linear regression and multiple regression were used to determine whether or not the degree of memory loss or the degree of attention deficit a subject demonstrated accounts for a significant amount of variance on the criteria variable of number of trials to complete the learning lessons. Generally, differences between all of the groups was found and the variance accounted for by degree of memory loss and attention deficit was found to be significant. A principal components factor analysis determined that there was a memory and general intelligence factor and an attention factor that contributed to a subjects performance on the learning lessons. The factors when entered simultaneously into a multiple regression equation accounted for about.50 percent of the variance in the number of trials required to complete the learning lessons. It was concluded, that the factors were statistically significant in determining performance on the learning lessons.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Dissertations, Academic.; Neurosciences.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Rehabilitation and Special Education; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Committee Chair:
Sales, Amos

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleDomain-specific learning: A neuropsychological rehabilitation investigation of vanishing cues.en_US
dc.creatorCotgageorge, Ed.en_US
dc.contributor.authorCotgageorge, Ed.en_US
dc.date.issued1992en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis project represents a descriptive study of 19 neurologically impaired adults. The etiology of the impairment includes traumatic brain injury and progressive neurological disease such as Alzheimer's Disease. Four non-impaired geriatric adults were controls for the Alzheimer's Disease patients in this study. Subjects in the study were taught, through the method of vanishing cues, information about computer operating system commands and computer programming. The primary purpose of this project was to determine whether or not these groups could acquire this information and determine the extent to which memory and attention deficits contribute to learning new information in neurologically impaired individuals. Subjects participated in learning sessions presented by a microcomputer. The sessions lasted for twenty minutes to one hour, depending on the subjects ability to attend to the task. Each subject interacted with the computer by answering the questions or doing the procedures presented. Not all of the subjects reached the criteria of zero or one hints that are required before moving on to the next lesson. None of the subjects with progressive neurological disease completed any of the lessons. Linear regression and multiple regression were used to determine whether or not the degree of memory loss or the degree of attention deficit a subject demonstrated accounts for a significant amount of variance on the criteria variable of number of trials to complete the learning lessons. Generally, differences between all of the groups was found and the variance accounted for by degree of memory loss and attention deficit was found to be significant. A principal components factor analysis determined that there was a memory and general intelligence factor and an attention factor that contributed to a subjects performance on the learning lessons. The factors when entered simultaneously into a multiple regression equation accounted for about.50 percent of the variance in the number of trials required to complete the learning lessons. It was concluded, that the factors were statistically significant in determining performance on the learning lessons.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectDissertations, Academic.en_US
dc.subjectNeurosciences.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineRehabilitation and Special Educationen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.chairSales, Amosen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberOrganist, Jamesen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberGlisky, Elizabethen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberTucker, Inez A.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberSmith, Maeen_US
dc.identifier.proquest9303299en_US
dc.identifier.oclc713067267en_US
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