Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/185955
Title:
The relationship between diet and melanoma in Arizona.
Author:
Soliman, Amr Saadeldin.
Issue Date:
1992
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Dietary intake for 261 cutaneous malignant melanoma cases were compared with 612 controls. Cases and controls were 18 to 80 years old at the time of the study. Cases were recruited from Pima, Santa Cruz, and Cochise, Arizona from December 1989 to January 1992. Controls were selected from the general population using the random digit dialing method from the same neighborhoods of cases at the same time period. Average weekly consumption of 114 food items, during the year preceding the study, was estimated using semiquantitative food frequency questionnaire. Food groups that may relate to melanoma were created and examined. Unconditional logistic regression models revealed a positive trend toward increased risk of malignant melanoma with increased consumption of total meat, red meat, baked or broiled chicken and fish in males. Male cases also consumed more cruciferous vegetables, string beans, carrots, and broccoli than controls. Moderate alcohol intake was associated with increased risk of melanoma in males and females. No significant difference was observed for the consumption of pies, cakes, or foods rich in polyunsaturated fat. The characteristic diet shown for males, in this study, was not related to vitamin intake or the time period between diagnosis and enrollment into the study. No food items or groups could be concluded to be related to melanoma in this study, however, changing life style and dietary pattern prior to diagnosis of melanoma or true distinct dietary patterns between male and female cases may explain the observed results.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Nutritional Sciences; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Committee Chair:
Moon, Thomas E.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleThe relationship between diet and melanoma in Arizona.en_US
dc.creatorSoliman, Amr Saadeldin.en_US
dc.contributor.authorSoliman, Amr Saadeldin.en_US
dc.date.issued1992en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractDietary intake for 261 cutaneous malignant melanoma cases were compared with 612 controls. Cases and controls were 18 to 80 years old at the time of the study. Cases were recruited from Pima, Santa Cruz, and Cochise, Arizona from December 1989 to January 1992. Controls were selected from the general population using the random digit dialing method from the same neighborhoods of cases at the same time period. Average weekly consumption of 114 food items, during the year preceding the study, was estimated using semiquantitative food frequency questionnaire. Food groups that may relate to melanoma were created and examined. Unconditional logistic regression models revealed a positive trend toward increased risk of malignant melanoma with increased consumption of total meat, red meat, baked or broiled chicken and fish in males. Male cases also consumed more cruciferous vegetables, string beans, carrots, and broccoli than controls. Moderate alcohol intake was associated with increased risk of melanoma in males and females. No significant difference was observed for the consumption of pies, cakes, or foods rich in polyunsaturated fat. The characteristic diet shown for males, in this study, was not related to vitamin intake or the time period between diagnosis and enrollment into the study. No food items or groups could be concluded to be related to melanoma in this study, however, changing life style and dietary pattern prior to diagnosis of melanoma or true distinct dietary patterns between male and female cases may explain the observed results.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineNutritional Sciencesen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.chairMoon, Thomas E.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberRitenbaugh, Cheryl K.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberWatson, Ronald R.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest9303298en_US
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