Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/185940
Title:
Sounds of fury: The rhetoric of Doomspeak.
Author:
Colavito, Joseph James.
Issue Date:
1992
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Doomspeak is loosely defined as any type of censorious discourse whose purpose is based upon the acquisition and maintenance of a semblance of credibility through rhetorical strategies that attempt to stonewall fruitful dialogue on issues. The focus of these discussions is the contemporary critique being directed at education, teachers, and institutions of higher learning. This text examines the "Doomspeak Matrix"--the rhetorical, historical, and socio-political dimensions of the phenomena--in an attempt to establish the parameters that help to create a tradition of educational critique. To help illuminate how the tradition manifests itself today in the virulent discussions that characterize much of the criticism brought to bear on academia, the dissertation analyzes the rhetorical techniques of Doomspeak that emanates from popular forums, and the response promulgated through more academic or professional founts. In these discussions, the emphasis is on illustrating how the discussions doom any attempts at reform because of the characteristic back-biting and in-fighting that they manifest. The discussions conclude with some considerations of how teachers might turn some of these discussions into positive classroom forces.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Dissertations, Academic.; Communication.; Education, Higher.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
English; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Committee Chair:
Willard, Thomas

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleSounds of fury: The rhetoric of Doomspeak.en_US
dc.creatorColavito, Joseph James.en_US
dc.contributor.authorColavito, Joseph James.en_US
dc.date.issued1992en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractDoomspeak is loosely defined as any type of censorious discourse whose purpose is based upon the acquisition and maintenance of a semblance of credibility through rhetorical strategies that attempt to stonewall fruitful dialogue on issues. The focus of these discussions is the contemporary critique being directed at education, teachers, and institutions of higher learning. This text examines the "Doomspeak Matrix"--the rhetorical, historical, and socio-political dimensions of the phenomena--in an attempt to establish the parameters that help to create a tradition of educational critique. To help illuminate how the tradition manifests itself today in the virulent discussions that characterize much of the criticism brought to bear on academia, the dissertation analyzes the rhetorical techniques of Doomspeak that emanates from popular forums, and the response promulgated through more academic or professional founts. In these discussions, the emphasis is on illustrating how the discussions doom any attempts at reform because of the characteristic back-biting and in-fighting that they manifest. The discussions conclude with some considerations of how teachers might turn some of these discussions into positive classroom forces.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectDissertations, Academic.en_US
dc.subjectCommunication.en_US
dc.subjectEducation, Higher.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineEnglishen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.chairWillard, Thomasen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberRoen, Duaneen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberEnos, Theresaen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberWarnock, Johnen_US
dc.identifier.proquest9303284en_US
dc.identifier.oclc713053279en_US
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