A FRAMEWORK FOR THE ANALYSIS OF AUTOMATED INTER-ORGANIZATIONAL INFORMATION SHARING SYSTEMS.

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/185915
Title:
A FRAMEWORK FOR THE ANALYSIS OF AUTOMATED INTER-ORGANIZATIONAL INFORMATION SHARING SYSTEMS.
Author:
BARRETT, STEPHANIE STOCK.
Issue Date:
1983
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
With the proliferation of computer networking technologies and improved systems development practice, organizationally-based information systems are beginning to include automated information interchange that transcends organizational boundaries. The scope of interorganizational systems ranges from the simple exchange of standardized messages to the integration of separate organizationally-based hardware and software components. The dissertation considers the characteristics of Automated Information Sharing Systems (IS*s) with a view toward developing classification schema and predicting issues of relevance to organizations and society arising from IS* development and evolution. Development of IS*s may be examined from a variety of perspectives including participation incentives and objectives as well as structural, growth and technical characteristics. Each of these is investigated by the analysis of actual case studies representing current and prototype IS* implementations. The output of the initial investigatory process is a set of representative taxonomies which may be used to classify and categorize IS*s. The primary taxonomic scheme, participation levels, represents categorization of IS*s on two bases: operational/technical characteristics and strategic utilization potentialities. Application taxonomies, interchange objective and interchange type, are also developed to provide a foundation for assessing the underlying characteristics of interchange prior to determining appropriate IS* application features. In this way, the thesis presents fundamental concepts for continuing research into the development and potential impact of IS*s.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Communication in organizations.; Computer networks.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Management Information Systems; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleA FRAMEWORK FOR THE ANALYSIS OF AUTOMATED INTER-ORGANIZATIONAL INFORMATION SHARING SYSTEMS.en_US
dc.creatorBARRETT, STEPHANIE STOCK.en_US
dc.contributor.authorBARRETT, STEPHANIE STOCK.en_US
dc.date.issued1983en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractWith the proliferation of computer networking technologies and improved systems development practice, organizationally-based information systems are beginning to include automated information interchange that transcends organizational boundaries. The scope of interorganizational systems ranges from the simple exchange of standardized messages to the integration of separate organizationally-based hardware and software components. The dissertation considers the characteristics of Automated Information Sharing Systems (IS*s) with a view toward developing classification schema and predicting issues of relevance to organizations and society arising from IS* development and evolution. Development of IS*s may be examined from a variety of perspectives including participation incentives and objectives as well as structural, growth and technical characteristics. Each of these is investigated by the analysis of actual case studies representing current and prototype IS* implementations. The output of the initial investigatory process is a set of representative taxonomies which may be used to classify and categorize IS*s. The primary taxonomic scheme, participation levels, represents categorization of IS*s on two bases: operational/technical characteristics and strategic utilization potentialities. Application taxonomies, interchange objective and interchange type, are also developed to provide a foundation for assessing the underlying characteristics of interchange prior to determining appropriate IS* application features. In this way, the thesis presents fundamental concepts for continuing research into the development and potential impact of IS*s.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectCommunication in organizations.en_US
dc.subjectComputer networks.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineManagement Information Systemsen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberNunamaker, Jay F.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberMason, Ricahard O.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest8315272en_US
dc.identifier.oclc688496769en_US
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