Alkali metal partitioning in a pulverized coal combustion environment.

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/185896
Title:
Alkali metal partitioning in a pulverized coal combustion environment.
Author:
Gallagher, Neal Benjamin.
Issue Date:
1992
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Fouling, slagging, corrosion, and emission of submicron particulate from pulverized coal combustors have been linked to vapor alkali. Size segregated fly ash samples extracted from a 17 kW down-fired pulverized coal combustor showed strong evidence of alkali vaporization. The fraction of sodium in sizes smaller than 0.65 μm (f(8A)) showed a correlation with acid soluble sodium divided by total silicates in the parent coal. Addition of silicates to coal reduced f(8A) for sodium. Potassium existing primarily in the mineral matter, did not show a similar correlation, but f(8A) for potassium did correlate with f(8A) for sodium. Bench scale experiments indicated potassium does not vaporize in the presence of Na or Cl alone, but requires both, and was only released when sodium was captured. Additional of sodium acetate to coal increased f(8A) for potassium. Equilibrium calculations, experiment, and modelling of sodium capture by silicates during pulverized coal combustion identified several important mechanisms governing alkali behavior. The mode of occurrence of alkali in the parent coal dictates its ability to vaporize, its release kinetics, and its sate as it diffuses to the char surface. Other species such as chlorine, sulfur, moisture, and other metals influence alkali stability in the vapor, its reactivity, and its condensation characteristics. Char oxidation can influence alkali vaporization, and capture by affecting included silicate surface area. Sodium reaction with silicates captures from 70 to over 95% of total sodium for typical coals. Silicate additive appears to be a viable technique for reducing the fraction of alkali in the vapor during combustion.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Alkali metals.; Coal, Pulverized.; Coal -- Combustion.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Chemical Engineering; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Wendt, Jost O.L.; Peterson, Thomas W.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleAlkali metal partitioning in a pulverized coal combustion environment.en_US
dc.creatorGallagher, Neal Benjamin.en_US
dc.contributor.authorGallagher, Neal Benjamin.en_US
dc.date.issued1992en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractFouling, slagging, corrosion, and emission of submicron particulate from pulverized coal combustors have been linked to vapor alkali. Size segregated fly ash samples extracted from a 17 kW down-fired pulverized coal combustor showed strong evidence of alkali vaporization. The fraction of sodium in sizes smaller than 0.65 μm (f(8A)) showed a correlation with acid soluble sodium divided by total silicates in the parent coal. Addition of silicates to coal reduced f(8A) for sodium. Potassium existing primarily in the mineral matter, did not show a similar correlation, but f(8A) for potassium did correlate with f(8A) for sodium. Bench scale experiments indicated potassium does not vaporize in the presence of Na or Cl alone, but requires both, and was only released when sodium was captured. Additional of sodium acetate to coal increased f(8A) for potassium. Equilibrium calculations, experiment, and modelling of sodium capture by silicates during pulverized coal combustion identified several important mechanisms governing alkali behavior. The mode of occurrence of alkali in the parent coal dictates its ability to vaporize, its release kinetics, and its sate as it diffuses to the char surface. Other species such as chlorine, sulfur, moisture, and other metals influence alkali stability in the vapor, its reactivity, and its condensation characteristics. Char oxidation can influence alkali vaporization, and capture by affecting included silicate surface area. Sodium reaction with silicates captures from 70 to over 95% of total sodium for typical coals. Silicate additive appears to be a viable technique for reducing the fraction of alkali in the vapor during combustion.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectAlkali metals.en_US
dc.subjectCoal, Pulverized.en_US
dc.subjectCoal -- Combustion.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineChemical Engineeringen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorWendt, Jost O.L.en_US
dc.contributor.advisorPeterson, Thomas W.-
dc.contributor.committeememberShadman, Farhangen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberMaier, Robert S.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest9234893en_US
dc.identifier.oclc701109402en_US
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