An assessment of selected factors contributing to the success of high quality college jazz studies programs.

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/185890
Title:
An assessment of selected factors contributing to the success of high quality college jazz studies programs.
Author:
Day, Michael Dennis.
Issue Date:
1992
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The purpose of this study was to determine what differences distinguish "quality jazz programs" from "other" programs and what might be learned from a comparison of the two groups that would be meaningful to jazz education. The study answered the questions: (1) is there a consensus among a group of jazz authorities regarding the ten "most effective" jazz programs in colleges and universities; and (2) are there characteristics of jazz programs considered outstanding by the profession that are not present in randomly selected college jazz programs? A panel of "experts" identified the top thirteen college jazz studies programs. A random group was selected from a list provided by the International Association of Jazz Educators. The "outstanding" population (n = 13) and the random population (n = 34) were sent identical survey instruments. The analysis of data identified significant differences between groups: (1) in the number of staff at every level (full-time faculty, adjunct faculty, and teaching assistants); (2) in the number of big bands, combos, and jazz choirs; and (3) in the number of undergraduate and graduate music majors in the institution. There was a significant difference between groups in the number of jazz combos and within the outstanding population between big bands and combos. Also, outstanding schools were more likely than the "other" schools to: (1) employ full-time jazz faculty; (2) have a vocal jazz program; (3) have an organized plan for recruiting and award jazz scholarships; (4) be located in larger urban areas with more opportunities for students to hear jazz; (5) offer a jazz studies degree; (6) offer a greater variety of jazz courses; (7) have a recording studio on campus; and (8) have a jazz requirement for music education students. Enrollments in jazz courses were increasing in both populations.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Music in universities and colleges.; Jazz -- Study and teaching (Graduate)
Degree Name:
D.M.A.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Music; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Hedden, Steven K.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleAn assessment of selected factors contributing to the success of high quality college jazz studies programs.en_US
dc.creatorDay, Michael Dennis.en_US
dc.contributor.authorDay, Michael Dennis.en_US
dc.date.issued1992en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe purpose of this study was to determine what differences distinguish "quality jazz programs" from "other" programs and what might be learned from a comparison of the two groups that would be meaningful to jazz education. The study answered the questions: (1) is there a consensus among a group of jazz authorities regarding the ten "most effective" jazz programs in colleges and universities; and (2) are there characteristics of jazz programs considered outstanding by the profession that are not present in randomly selected college jazz programs? A panel of "experts" identified the top thirteen college jazz studies programs. A random group was selected from a list provided by the International Association of Jazz Educators. The "outstanding" population (n = 13) and the random population (n = 34) were sent identical survey instruments. The analysis of data identified significant differences between groups: (1) in the number of staff at every level (full-time faculty, adjunct faculty, and teaching assistants); (2) in the number of big bands, combos, and jazz choirs; and (3) in the number of undergraduate and graduate music majors in the institution. There was a significant difference between groups in the number of jazz combos and within the outstanding population between big bands and combos. Also, outstanding schools were more likely than the "other" schools to: (1) employ full-time jazz faculty; (2) have a vocal jazz program; (3) have an organized plan for recruiting and award jazz scholarships; (4) be located in larger urban areas with more opportunities for students to hear jazz; (5) offer a jazz studies degree; (6) offer a greater variety of jazz courses; (7) have a recording studio on campus; and (8) have a jazz requirement for music education students. Enrollments in jazz courses were increasing in both populations.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectMusic in universities and colleges.en_US
dc.subjectJazz -- Study and teaching (Graduate)en_US
thesis.degree.nameD.M.A.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineMusicen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorHedden, Steven K.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberFitch, Johnen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberWilson, Garyen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberHaskell, Jeffreyen_US
dc.identifier.proquest9234887en_US
dc.identifier.oclc704992191en_US
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