Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/185876
Title:
Voices and viewpoints: Teaching writing in grades four and five.
Author:
Sudol, David Eugene.
Issue Date:
1992
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Responding to recent calls throughout the field for more studies of teaching, I present case studies of four elementary teachers--two fourth grade, two fifth grade--implementing process pedagogy in writers' workshops. Specifically, I examine how they teach, why they succeed and fail, and what they need to teach more effectively. Chapter 1 provides a brief overview of the study, explaining my purpose and rationale. Chapter 2 builds a knowledge base by presenting a survey of the recent literature on elementary school writing teaching. Focusing primarily on the works of Donald Graves, Lucy Calkins, and Nancie Atwell--the prime movers in the field--it details the major principles and components of the writing-process movement. Chapter 3 lays out the concrete particulars and theoretical bases of my research, explaining context, methodology, and presentation. Chapters 4 through 7 present individual case studies of the teachers I studied. Each chapter includes four sections: (1) Teacher Profile, (2) Classroom Observations, (3) Interview, and (4) Interpretation. Chapter 8 analyzes why these teachers teach writing as they do, re-evaluates the revolution in elementary writing, and speculates on the future of writing instruction at this school. In line with the experimental movement in contemporary ethnography, I have written this dissertation in a conversational tone and confessional voice. Through alternative text-building strategies, I attempt to make my epistemology visible and to represent this teaching community completely.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Dissertations, Academic.; Education -- Study and teaching.; Teaching.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
English; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Fleming, Margaret B.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleVoices and viewpoints: Teaching writing in grades four and five.en_US
dc.creatorSudol, David Eugene.en_US
dc.contributor.authorSudol, David Eugene.en_US
dc.date.issued1992en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractResponding to recent calls throughout the field for more studies of teaching, I present case studies of four elementary teachers--two fourth grade, two fifth grade--implementing process pedagogy in writers' workshops. Specifically, I examine how they teach, why they succeed and fail, and what they need to teach more effectively. Chapter 1 provides a brief overview of the study, explaining my purpose and rationale. Chapter 2 builds a knowledge base by presenting a survey of the recent literature on elementary school writing teaching. Focusing primarily on the works of Donald Graves, Lucy Calkins, and Nancie Atwell--the prime movers in the field--it details the major principles and components of the writing-process movement. Chapter 3 lays out the concrete particulars and theoretical bases of my research, explaining context, methodology, and presentation. Chapters 4 through 7 present individual case studies of the teachers I studied. Each chapter includes four sections: (1) Teacher Profile, (2) Classroom Observations, (3) Interview, and (4) Interpretation. Chapter 8 analyzes why these teachers teach writing as they do, re-evaluates the revolution in elementary writing, and speculates on the future of writing instruction at this school. In line with the experimental movement in contemporary ethnography, I have written this dissertation in a conversational tone and confessional voice. Through alternative text-building strategies, I attempt to make my epistemology visible and to represent this teaching community completely.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectDissertations, Academic.en_US
dc.subjectEducation -- Study and teaching.en_US
dc.subjectTeaching.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineEnglishen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorFleming, Margaret B.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberGoodman, Yetta M.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberEvers, Lawrence J.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberRoen, Duane H.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest9234874en_US
dc.identifier.oclc712782748en_US
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