Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/185861
Title:
Orchestrational archetypes in Percy Grainger's wind band music.
Author:
Wilson, Brian Scott
Issue Date:
1992
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
This study closely examines the orchestrational techniques in four of Percy Grainger's wind band compositions; Colonial Song, Irish Tune From County Perry, Molly On The Shore, and five movements from Lincolnshire Posy; Lisbon, Horkstow Grange, The Brisk Young Sailor, and The Lost Lady Found. These are works which are representative of Grainger' s orchestrational techniques. This information has been used to newly orchestrate three of Grainger's pieces for band in his orchestrational style. They are The Cutting of the Hay, Lord Maxwell's Goodnight, and British Waterside (or The Jolly Sailor). It is interesting to note that all but one of these band works (Horkstow Grange) are orchestrations of previously completed compositions. Presumably, Grainger's attention would have been focused on matters of scoring only when writing for band. In analyzing Grainger's orchestrational techniques in these pieces, I have not made any value judgments as to their success. I have also been very careful not to compare these techniques to any other composer. Rather, I have done an exhaustive survey of recurring orchestrational techniques in an attempt to understand why his wind band music sounds the way it does. Chapter I identifies and codifies Grainger's scoring of melodic material. Similarly, Chapter II deals with countermelodic material. Chapter III examines recurring features in Grainger's part writing. Chapter IV documents his preoccupation with contrapuntal dynamic techniques. There is no debate that Grainger made an original contribution to the wind band literature. This study has explored in depth Grainger's orchestrational techniques in an attempt to show specifically why his wind band music is so readily identifiable as Grainger. It is my assertion that the Grainger 'sound' is a function of recurring orchestrational techniques rather than other compositional elements such as melody or harmony. His consistent choice of doublings for both melody and countermelody place a personal stamp upon his music. His continual use of contrapuntal dynamics to achieve timbrel effects also renders his music distinguishable as being only by Grainger. His part writing proves always to be uniquely satisfying because of the constant voice shifting and meandering parts.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Instrumentation and orchestration (Band)
Degree Name:
A.Mus.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Music; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Hanson, Gregg I.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleOrchestrational archetypes in Percy Grainger's wind band music.en_US
dc.creatorWilson, Brian Scotten_US
dc.contributor.authorWilson, Brian Scotten_US
dc.date.issued1992en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis study closely examines the orchestrational techniques in four of Percy Grainger's wind band compositions; Colonial Song, Irish Tune From County Perry, Molly On The Shore, and five movements from Lincolnshire Posy; Lisbon, Horkstow Grange, The Brisk Young Sailor, and The Lost Lady Found. These are works which are representative of Grainger' s orchestrational techniques. This information has been used to newly orchestrate three of Grainger's pieces for band in his orchestrational style. They are The Cutting of the Hay, Lord Maxwell's Goodnight, and British Waterside (or The Jolly Sailor). It is interesting to note that all but one of these band works (Horkstow Grange) are orchestrations of previously completed compositions. Presumably, Grainger's attention would have been focused on matters of scoring only when writing for band. In analyzing Grainger's orchestrational techniques in these pieces, I have not made any value judgments as to their success. I have also been very careful not to compare these techniques to any other composer. Rather, I have done an exhaustive survey of recurring orchestrational techniques in an attempt to understand why his wind band music sounds the way it does. Chapter I identifies and codifies Grainger's scoring of melodic material. Similarly, Chapter II deals with countermelodic material. Chapter III examines recurring features in Grainger's part writing. Chapter IV documents his preoccupation with contrapuntal dynamic techniques. There is no debate that Grainger made an original contribution to the wind band literature. This study has explored in depth Grainger's orchestrational techniques in an attempt to show specifically why his wind band music is so readily identifiable as Grainger. It is my assertion that the Grainger 'sound' is a function of recurring orchestrational techniques rather than other compositional elements such as melody or harmony. His consistent choice of doublings for both melody and countermelody place a personal stamp upon his music. His continual use of contrapuntal dynamics to achieve timbrel effects also renders his music distinguishable as being only by Grainger. His part writing proves always to be uniquely satisfying because of the constant voice shifting and meandering parts.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectInstrumentation and orchestration (Band)en_US
thesis.degree.nameA.Mus.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineMusicen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorHanson, Gregg I.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberAsia, Danielen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberHaskell, Jeffreyen_US
dc.identifier.proquest9229855en_US
dc.identifier.oclc701733313en_US
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