Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/185849
Title:
The major chloroplast low molecular weight heat shock protein.
Author:
Chen, Qiang.
Issue Date:
1992
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The goal of this dissertation is to provide information critical for understanding the function of the major chloroplast LMW HSP. The results of this research show that the production of a nuclear-encoded, chloroplast LMW HSP is a highly conserved event in the plant HS response, and that the HSP itself is highly homologous in divergent plant species. Three major conserved regions were identified in the chloroplast LMW HSP. The carboxyl-terminal HS domain of the chloroplast LMW HSP is also found in cytoplasmic LMW HSPs and identifies it as a member of the superfamily of eukaryotic LMW HSPs. The amino-terminal region is unique to the chloroplast LMW HSP and is capable of forming a Met-rich amphipathic α-helix. The chloroplast LMW HSP cannot be detected at normal growth temperatures, but accumulates dramatically in both leaves and roots during HS. The chloroplast LMW HSP is a stable protein with a half-life of approximately 52 h. In the chloroplast, the majority of PsHSP21 is localized in the soluble protein fraction. In its native state, PsHSP21 exists in a 200 kDa particle as is observed for cytoplasmic LMW HSPs. However, unlike the cytoplasmic LMW HSPs, the PsHSP21-containing particles do not aggregate into heat shock granules even under severe, abrupt HS conditions. The formation of the PsHPS21-containing particle can be replicated in isolated chloroplasts, but the chloroplasts must be from heat stressed plants. The protein sequence homology and the similar native structure of the LMW cytoplasmic and chloroplast HSPs suggests they perform similar functions in different cellular compartments. I propose that the 200 kDa particle is the functional form of PsHSP21. Furthermore, the chloroplast LMW HSP performs functions in all types of plastids similar to those of the cytoplasmic LMW HSPs, but with unique substrates within the special environment of plastids. This study provides the first information regarding the expression and structure of the chloroplast LMW HSP. Since the chloroplast contains only a single major LMW HSP, this study also provides the basis for developing a simple model system for studies of the function of all members of the ubiquitous LMW HSP family.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Dissertations, Academic.; Chloroplasts -- Formation -- Regulation.; Chloroplasts.; Molecular biology.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Biochemistry; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Vierling, Elizabeth

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleThe major chloroplast low molecular weight heat shock protein.en_US
dc.creatorChen, Qiang.en_US
dc.contributor.authorChen, Qiang.en_US
dc.date.issued1992en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe goal of this dissertation is to provide information critical for understanding the function of the major chloroplast LMW HSP. The results of this research show that the production of a nuclear-encoded, chloroplast LMW HSP is a highly conserved event in the plant HS response, and that the HSP itself is highly homologous in divergent plant species. Three major conserved regions were identified in the chloroplast LMW HSP. The carboxyl-terminal HS domain of the chloroplast LMW HSP is also found in cytoplasmic LMW HSPs and identifies it as a member of the superfamily of eukaryotic LMW HSPs. The amino-terminal region is unique to the chloroplast LMW HSP and is capable of forming a Met-rich amphipathic α-helix. The chloroplast LMW HSP cannot be detected at normal growth temperatures, but accumulates dramatically in both leaves and roots during HS. The chloroplast LMW HSP is a stable protein with a half-life of approximately 52 h. In the chloroplast, the majority of PsHSP21 is localized in the soluble protein fraction. In its native state, PsHSP21 exists in a 200 kDa particle as is observed for cytoplasmic LMW HSPs. However, unlike the cytoplasmic LMW HSPs, the PsHSP21-containing particles do not aggregate into heat shock granules even under severe, abrupt HS conditions. The formation of the PsHPS21-containing particle can be replicated in isolated chloroplasts, but the chloroplasts must be from heat stressed plants. The protein sequence homology and the similar native structure of the LMW cytoplasmic and chloroplast HSPs suggests they perform similar functions in different cellular compartments. I propose that the 200 kDa particle is the functional form of PsHSP21. Furthermore, the chloroplast LMW HSP performs functions in all types of plastids similar to those of the cytoplasmic LMW HSPs, but with unique substrates within the special environment of plastids. This study provides the first information regarding the expression and structure of the chloroplast LMW HSP. Since the chloroplast contains only a single major LMW HSP, this study also provides the basis for developing a simple model system for studies of the function of all members of the ubiquitous LMW HSP family.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectDissertations, Academic.en_US
dc.subjectChloroplasts -- Formation -- Regulation.en_US
dc.subjectChloroplasts.en_US
dc.subjectMolecular biology.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineBiochemistryen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorVierling, Elizabethen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberBohnert, Hans J.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberLaw, John H.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberWells, Michael A.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest9229844en_US
dc.identifier.oclc712673687en_US
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