Psychophysical and signal detection analyses of hypnotic anesthesia.

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/185845
Title:
Psychophysical and signal detection analyses of hypnotic anesthesia.
Author:
Tataryn, Douglas Joseph.
Issue Date:
1992
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Two experiments designed to study the effects of hypnotic suggestions on tactile sensitivity are reported. Experiment 1 utilized 40 subjects selected and classified into four groups according to their scores on the Stanford Scale of Hypnotic Susceptibility: Form C (SHSS:C). The effects of suggestions for anesthesia, as measured by both traditional psychophysical methods and signal detection procedures, were linearly related to hypnotic susceptibility. Experiment 2 employed the same methodologies in an application of the real-simulator paradigm, to examine the effects of suggestions for both anesthesia and hyperesthesia. A total of 19 undergraduate students were selected for their scores on the SHSS:C and classified into two groups: insusceptible simulators, who were given instructions to simulate the behavior of a highly hypnotizable person; and highly hypnotizable reals, who underwent a standard hypnotic procedure. Significant effects of hypnotic suggestion on both sensitivity and bias were found in the anesthesia condition, but not for the hyperesthesia condition. A new bias parameter, C', was derived which indicated that much of the bias found in the initial analyses was artifactual, a function of changes in sensitivity across conditions. There were no behavioral differences between reals and simulators in any of the conditions, though analyses of post-experimental interviews suggested the two groups had very different phenomenal experiences. Finally, a manipulation of response strategies induced different levels of sensitivity. The implications of these and other similar findings for signal detection theory are discussed in the context of implicit and explicit perception. Taken together, these results indicate that hypnotic suggestions can produce genuine decrements but not increments, in tactile sensitivity. The magnitude of these changes are partly a function of which perceptual system--the implicit or the explicit--is implicated in the assessment of sensitivity. Overall, these conclusions are consistent with 'neodissociation' accounts of hypnotic phenomena.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Psychology.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Psychology; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Kihlstrom, John

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titlePsychophysical and signal detection analyses of hypnotic anesthesia.en_US
dc.creatorTataryn, Douglas Joseph.en_US
dc.contributor.authorTataryn, Douglas Joseph.en_US
dc.date.issued1992en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractTwo experiments designed to study the effects of hypnotic suggestions on tactile sensitivity are reported. Experiment 1 utilized 40 subjects selected and classified into four groups according to their scores on the Stanford Scale of Hypnotic Susceptibility: Form C (SHSS:C). The effects of suggestions for anesthesia, as measured by both traditional psychophysical methods and signal detection procedures, were linearly related to hypnotic susceptibility. Experiment 2 employed the same methodologies in an application of the real-simulator paradigm, to examine the effects of suggestions for both anesthesia and hyperesthesia. A total of 19 undergraduate students were selected for their scores on the SHSS:C and classified into two groups: insusceptible simulators, who were given instructions to simulate the behavior of a highly hypnotizable person; and highly hypnotizable reals, who underwent a standard hypnotic procedure. Significant effects of hypnotic suggestion on both sensitivity and bias were found in the anesthesia condition, but not for the hyperesthesia condition. A new bias parameter, C', was derived which indicated that much of the bias found in the initial analyses was artifactual, a function of changes in sensitivity across conditions. There were no behavioral differences between reals and simulators in any of the conditions, though analyses of post-experimental interviews suggested the two groups had very different phenomenal experiences. Finally, a manipulation of response strategies induced different levels of sensitivity. The implications of these and other similar findings for signal detection theory are discussed in the context of implicit and explicit perception. Taken together, these results indicate that hypnotic suggestions can produce genuine decrements but not increments, in tactile sensitivity. The magnitude of these changes are partly a function of which perceptual system--the implicit or the explicit--is implicated in the assessment of sensitivity. Overall, these conclusions are consistent with 'neodissociation' accounts of hypnotic phenomena.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectPsychology.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplinePsychologyen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorKihlstrom, Johnen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberBootzin, Richarden_US
dc.contributor.committeememberNadel, Lynnen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberPeterson, Maryen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberSalomon, Vardaen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberFigueredo, A.J.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest9229841en_US
dc.identifier.oclc703897540en_US
All Items in UA Campus Repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.