Choral seating arrangements and their effects on musical and social elements.

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/185836
Title:
Choral seating arrangements and their effects on musical and social elements.
Author:
Keyne, Lori Valerie.
Issue Date:
1992
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Choral experts have promoted either sectional block or mixed seating formations in choirs for various reasons. Previous research by Lambson indicates that there is no clear advantage to choral sound in either mixed or sectional formations, and, according to Tocheff, mixed formation has no advantage over sectional block formation. This research attempted to relate choral seating arrangements to individual musical growth and sociological dynamics. One hypothesis suggested that a mixed formation promotes individual musical growth in ear-training/sight-singing, vocal freedom, perceived scope of a choral work and also promotes group cohesion. The second and third hypotheses considered the correlation between the percentage of time spent in mixed formation and individual and group trust. Only two relationships were statistically significant: between mixed formation and perceived scope of a choral work, and between the percentage of time spent in mixed formation and group trust. An ancillary finding suggests that individuals who sing in mixed formation, prefer to sing with individuals from different voice parts. These findings suggest that individual musical growth and individual responsibility are enhanced in mixed formation.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Choral singing -- Sociological aspects.
Degree Name:
A.Mus.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Music; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Skones, Maurice H.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleChoral seating arrangements and their effects on musical and social elements.en_US
dc.creatorKeyne, Lori Valerie.en_US
dc.contributor.authorKeyne, Lori Valerie.en_US
dc.date.issued1992en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractChoral experts have promoted either sectional block or mixed seating formations in choirs for various reasons. Previous research by Lambson indicates that there is no clear advantage to choral sound in either mixed or sectional formations, and, according to Tocheff, mixed formation has no advantage over sectional block formation. This research attempted to relate choral seating arrangements to individual musical growth and sociological dynamics. One hypothesis suggested that a mixed formation promotes individual musical growth in ear-training/sight-singing, vocal freedom, perceived scope of a choral work and also promotes group cohesion. The second and third hypotheses considered the correlation between the percentage of time spent in mixed formation and individual and group trust. Only two relationships were statistically significant: between mixed formation and perceived scope of a choral work, and between the percentage of time spent in mixed formation and group trust. An ancillary finding suggests that individuals who sing in mixed formation, prefer to sing with individuals from different voice parts. These findings suggest that individual musical growth and individual responsibility are enhanced in mixed formation.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectChoral singing -- Sociological aspects.en_US
thesis.degree.nameA.Mus.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineMusicen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorSkones, Maurice H.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberHedden, Steven K.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberKnott, Josefen_US
dc.identifier.proquest9229833en_US
dc.identifier.oclc704984527en_US
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