The relationship between cortical bone involution and fracture occurrence in an affluent aging American white population.

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/185834
Title:
The relationship between cortical bone involution and fracture occurrence in an affluent aging American white population.
Author:
Harrington, Richard James.
Issue Date:
1992
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
A study of peripheral cortical bone mineral status, as measured by single-photon absorptiometry, was initiated in Sun City, Arizona, in 1982. Affluent, active white women over age 50 and men over age 60 participated in up to eight annual sessions involving the measurement of the left mid-distal radius and the collection of questionnaire data. The data were retrospectively analyzed with a focus on the relationship between the bone mineral variables (BMVs: mass, areal density, density, width, and second moment of area) and postmature (after age 50) fracture history. Fractures were classified as either retrospective (incurred prior to baseline session) or prospective (incurred during the interval between baseline and final sessions). A distinction was made between hip fractures, which are often debilitating, and non-hip fractures, which, in the case of this sample, were sufficiently "benign" to allow resumption of more or less normal physical activities. The following results were obtained: (1) Women with low baseline bone mass incurred about three times as many retrospective benign fractures as the women with high baseline bone mass. (2) Women with retrospective benign fractures were about three times as likely as nonfracture women to sustain prospective benign fractures; consideration of BMV status did not improve predictive power. (3) Rate of interval bone loss is no different between the prospective fracture women and their nonfracture counterparts; the fracture group, however, shows no evidence of new bone formation via periosteal apposition (as inferred from bone width changes), whereas the nonfracture group is characterized by modest width increases. (4) The men have more massive bones and fewer fractures than the women, with no significant correlations between BMVs and fracture status. These results reaffirm that BMVs, particularly mass, are highly correlated with postmature fracture status in women, but the BMVs are better in "predicting" past fracture than in predicting future first fracture. This would be expected if systemic postfracture remodeling processes either promote resorption or inhibit new bone formation, with the latter response strongly implicated in this study.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Dissertations, Academic.; Physical anthropology.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Anthropology; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Stini, William A.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleThe relationship between cortical bone involution and fracture occurrence in an affluent aging American white population.en_US
dc.creatorHarrington, Richard James.en_US
dc.contributor.authorHarrington, Richard James.en_US
dc.date.issued1992en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractA study of peripheral cortical bone mineral status, as measured by single-photon absorptiometry, was initiated in Sun City, Arizona, in 1982. Affluent, active white women over age 50 and men over age 60 participated in up to eight annual sessions involving the measurement of the left mid-distal radius and the collection of questionnaire data. The data were retrospectively analyzed with a focus on the relationship between the bone mineral variables (BMVs: mass, areal density, density, width, and second moment of area) and postmature (after age 50) fracture history. Fractures were classified as either retrospective (incurred prior to baseline session) or prospective (incurred during the interval between baseline and final sessions). A distinction was made between hip fractures, which are often debilitating, and non-hip fractures, which, in the case of this sample, were sufficiently "benign" to allow resumption of more or less normal physical activities. The following results were obtained: (1) Women with low baseline bone mass incurred about three times as many retrospective benign fractures as the women with high baseline bone mass. (2) Women with retrospective benign fractures were about three times as likely as nonfracture women to sustain prospective benign fractures; consideration of BMV status did not improve predictive power. (3) Rate of interval bone loss is no different between the prospective fracture women and their nonfracture counterparts; the fracture group, however, shows no evidence of new bone formation via periosteal apposition (as inferred from bone width changes), whereas the nonfracture group is characterized by modest width increases. (4) The men have more massive bones and fewer fractures than the women, with no significant correlations between BMVs and fracture status. These results reaffirm that BMVs, particularly mass, are highly correlated with postmature fracture status in women, but the BMVs are better in "predicting" past fracture than in predicting future first fracture. This would be expected if systemic postfracture remodeling processes either promote resorption or inhibit new bone formation, with the latter response strongly implicated in this study.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectDissertations, Academic.en_US
dc.subjectPhysical anthropology.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineAnthropologyen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorStini, William A.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberMorbeck, Mary Ellenen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberBirkby, Walter H.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest9225194en_US
dc.identifier.oclc712295349en_US
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