Factors influencing implementation of innovations in clinical nursing education.

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/185822
Title:
Factors influencing implementation of innovations in clinical nursing education.
Author:
Nugent, Lynn Louise Bartlett.
Issue Date:
1992
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The purposes of this study were to determine whether associate degree nursing (ADN) programs were implementing innovations in their clinical curricula, to identify recent clinical innovations in these nursing programs, and to identify attributes of innovations that influence innovation adoption. Data were obtained from two questionnaires to all directors of ADN programs in six southwestern states. The first questionnaire asked respondents to identify clinical innovations they had considered recently. The second questionnaire used a Likert Scale to seek respondents' perception of six attributes of innovations--Relative Advantage, Compatibility, Complexity, Observability, Trialability, and Cost--that come from diffusion theory. Analysis of data indicated that 77% of the respondents had implemented changes in their clinical curriculum during the past six years. The most frequently implemented innovations were computer assisted instruction, preceptorship experiences, clinical competency exams, initiating or increasing use of skills labs, and workstudy/externship experiences. Likert Scale values for perceptions of the six attributes, along with a variable created to represent the influence of the Environment, were analyzed by principal component analysis and logistic regression analysis. These analyses led to the conclusion that no one or two variables can be used to predict adoption of an innovation. Instead, a model with each of the attributes should be used in predicting adoption. These findings generally supported the model provided by diffusion theory. However, the influence of Trialability was negligible. Additionally, the Environment variable was found to be an important influence in a favorable adoption decision. Nursing program directors who seek to implement innovations could enhance successful implementation by emphasizing the positive aspects of all attributes of a proposed innovation.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Dissertations, Academic.; Nursing -- Study and teaching.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Higher Education; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Leslie, Larry L.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleFactors influencing implementation of innovations in clinical nursing education.en_US
dc.creatorNugent, Lynn Louise Bartlett.en_US
dc.contributor.authorNugent, Lynn Louise Bartlett.en_US
dc.date.issued1992en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe purposes of this study were to determine whether associate degree nursing (ADN) programs were implementing innovations in their clinical curricula, to identify recent clinical innovations in these nursing programs, and to identify attributes of innovations that influence innovation adoption. Data were obtained from two questionnaires to all directors of ADN programs in six southwestern states. The first questionnaire asked respondents to identify clinical innovations they had considered recently. The second questionnaire used a Likert Scale to seek respondents' perception of six attributes of innovations--Relative Advantage, Compatibility, Complexity, Observability, Trialability, and Cost--that come from diffusion theory. Analysis of data indicated that 77% of the respondents had implemented changes in their clinical curriculum during the past six years. The most frequently implemented innovations were computer assisted instruction, preceptorship experiences, clinical competency exams, initiating or increasing use of skills labs, and workstudy/externship experiences. Likert Scale values for perceptions of the six attributes, along with a variable created to represent the influence of the Environment, were analyzed by principal component analysis and logistic regression analysis. These analyses led to the conclusion that no one or two variables can be used to predict adoption of an innovation. Instead, a model with each of the attributes should be used in predicting adoption. These findings generally supported the model provided by diffusion theory. However, the influence of Trialability was negligible. Additionally, the Environment variable was found to be an important influence in a favorable adoption decision. Nursing program directors who seek to implement innovations could enhance successful implementation by emphasizing the positive aspects of all attributes of a proposed innovation.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectDissertations, Academic.en_US
dc.subjectNursing -- Study and teaching.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineHigher Educationen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorLeslie, Larry L.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberSlaughter, Sheliaen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberRhoades, Garyen_US
dc.identifier.proquest9225183en_US
dc.identifier.oclc712649179en_US
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