Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/185807
Title:
Teachers' receptivity to teaching models.
Author:
Fleming, Miri.
Issue Date:
1992
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The focus of this study is teachers' receptivity to new teaching models. Traditionally, research has been conducted to assess teachers' implementation of innovations. The stage prior to learning and implementing the model generally has been generally ignored. In this study, the researcher assumed that the level of teachers' receptivity could influence upon whether and to what extent the new teaching model is implemented. This study was designed to identify personal characteristics and environmental variables that affect the degree of teacher receptivity to a teaching model. Four teacher-participants were selected according to their level of receptivity to one of the models included in the study, Madeline Hunter's Essential Elements of Instruction or Hilda Taba's Teaching Strategies. The data collected through interviews were analyzed in two directions. First, participants' beliefs, experiences, and workplace conditions were identified using qualitative case study methodology. Second, participants' perceptions of the teaching models were analyzed using Rogers' (1962) framework for determining characteristics of an innovation. Several themes related to participants' receptivity to new teaching models, and their beliefs, experiences, and workplace conditions were revealed. These comprise differences in teachers' pedagogical orientations and in their perceptions of teaching models' characteristics, including the way the model was introduced, changes in levels receptivity, teaching models in relation to the student population served, satisfaction with workplace conditions, level of familiarity with the new teaching model, teachers' independence, and behavioral changes required by the teaching model. The study may be of particular interest to staff developers and educators of students teachers because of the importance of considering teachers' individual needs and characteristics when introducing new teaching models.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Dissertations, Academic.; Teachers -- Training of.; Education -- Curricula.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Special Education and Rehabilitation; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Griffin, Gary A.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleTeachers' receptivity to teaching models.en_US
dc.creatorFleming, Miri.en_US
dc.contributor.authorFleming, Miri.en_US
dc.date.issued1992en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe focus of this study is teachers' receptivity to new teaching models. Traditionally, research has been conducted to assess teachers' implementation of innovations. The stage prior to learning and implementing the model generally has been generally ignored. In this study, the researcher assumed that the level of teachers' receptivity could influence upon whether and to what extent the new teaching model is implemented. This study was designed to identify personal characteristics and environmental variables that affect the degree of teacher receptivity to a teaching model. Four teacher-participants were selected according to their level of receptivity to one of the models included in the study, Madeline Hunter's Essential Elements of Instruction or Hilda Taba's Teaching Strategies. The data collected through interviews were analyzed in two directions. First, participants' beliefs, experiences, and workplace conditions were identified using qualitative case study methodology. Second, participants' perceptions of the teaching models were analyzed using Rogers' (1962) framework for determining characteristics of an innovation. Several themes related to participants' receptivity to new teaching models, and their beliefs, experiences, and workplace conditions were revealed. These comprise differences in teachers' pedagogical orientations and in their perceptions of teaching models' characteristics, including the way the model was introduced, changes in levels receptivity, teaching models in relation to the student population served, satisfaction with workplace conditions, level of familiarity with the new teaching model, teachers' independence, and behavioral changes required by the teaching model. The study may be of particular interest to staff developers and educators of students teachers because of the importance of considering teachers' individual needs and characteristics when introducing new teaching models.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectDissertations, Academic.en_US
dc.subjectTeachers -- Training of.en_US
dc.subjectEducation -- Curricula.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineSpecial Education and Rehabilitationen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorGriffin, Gary A.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberRichardson, Virginiaen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberMaker, C. Juneen_US
dc.identifier.proquest9225169en_US
dc.identifier.oclc712284668en_US
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