Spatial memory abilities and abnormal development of the hippocampal formation in Down syndrome.

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/185800
Title:
Spatial memory abilities and abnormal development of the hippocampal formation in Down syndrome.
Author:
Mangan, Peter Anthony
Issue Date:
1992
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The recent evidence concerning the nature of cognitive development in Down Syndrome (DS) suggests that it is different than normal development. The neuropathology seen in DS implicates a prenatal interruption of normal neural development as a possible basis for these differences. Since the hippocampal formation (HF) undergoes extensive postnatal maturation and is found to be abnormal in DS, it is proposed that cognitive deficits associated with DS would be most evident in tasks requiring hippocampal function. The performance of DS children at 16-18 months and 28-30 months of age was compared to that of age-matched control groups of normal children on two cognitive tasks requiring abilities that develop during the first postnatal year shown not to involve hippocampal function, and a task requiring abilities that develop during the second postnatal year shown to require hippocampal functioning. The results show that the DS performed comparably on the nonhippocampal tasks but differently on the hippocampal task. The normal children's performance supports the position that the ability to perform HF tasks develops during the second postnatal year while the performance of the older DS children suggested that this development does not occur in DS. The specificity of the deficits to the hippocampal task was interpreted as indicative of a lack of HF development in DS.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Dissertations, Academic.; Neurosciences.; Developmental psychology.; Down syndrome.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Social and Behavioral Sciences; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Rosser, Rosemary

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleSpatial memory abilities and abnormal development of the hippocampal formation in Down syndrome.en_US
dc.creatorMangan, Peter Anthonyen_US
dc.contributor.authorMangan, Peter Anthonyen_US
dc.date.issued1992en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe recent evidence concerning the nature of cognitive development in Down Syndrome (DS) suggests that it is different than normal development. The neuropathology seen in DS implicates a prenatal interruption of normal neural development as a possible basis for these differences. Since the hippocampal formation (HF) undergoes extensive postnatal maturation and is found to be abnormal in DS, it is proposed that cognitive deficits associated with DS would be most evident in tasks requiring hippocampal function. The performance of DS children at 16-18 months and 28-30 months of age was compared to that of age-matched control groups of normal children on two cognitive tasks requiring abilities that develop during the first postnatal year shown not to involve hippocampal function, and a task requiring abilities that develop during the second postnatal year shown to require hippocampal functioning. The results show that the DS performed comparably on the nonhippocampal tasks but differently on the hippocampal task. The normal children's performance supports the position that the ability to perform HF tasks develops during the second postnatal year while the performance of the older DS children suggested that this development does not occur in DS. The specificity of the deficits to the hippocampal task was interpreted as indicative of a lack of HF development in DS.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectDissertations, Academic.en_US
dc.subjectNeurosciences.en_US
dc.subjectDevelopmental psychology.en_US
dc.subjectDown syndrome.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineSocial and Behavioral Sciencesen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorRosser, Rosemaryen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberAngevine, Jay B., Jr.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberFerry, Peggy C.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberLansing, Roberten_US
dc.identifier.proquest9223567en_US
dc.identifier.oclc712202963en_US
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