Predicting adolescents' responses during conflict with their parents: An explication and initial test of the Identity Maintenance Model.

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/185785
Title:
Predicting adolescents' responses during conflict with their parents: An explication and initial test of the Identity Maintenance Model.
Author:
Comstock, Jayne Marie.
Issue Date:
1992
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The Cognitive Communicator Characteristic Model was reformulated to form The Identity Maintenance Model (IMM), a cognitive-affective model of interpersonal interaction. The IMM postulates that cognitive structures in the form of role identity goals have considerable impact on behavioral dispositions. However, these dispositions are moderated by contextual self-esteem (CSE) in moderately or highly negative affective conditions. The model was tested in the context of parent-adolescent conflict. Study One determined the triggers of affective assessment and Study Two tested the hypotheses stipulated by the model. When applied to parent-adolescent conflict, the IMM predicted that as adolescents' CSE and negative affect increased, adolescents would use more competitive than cooperative strategies while as CSE decreased and negative affect increased, adolescents would display no change in use of cooperative relative to competitive strategies. This hypothesis was not supported. Rather, main effects for CSE and affect intensity obtained such that as CSE increased, the use of cooperative strategies increased and as affective intensity increased, the use of competitive strategies increased. It also was predicted that as contextual self-esteem decreased and negative affect increased, adolescents would use more avoidance rather than competitive approach strategies. This hypothesis also was not supported. Instead, a main effect for affective condition obtained such that as negative affect increased, the use of competitive approach moves also increased. Self-monitoring was added to the model because the IMM stipulates that high self-monitors are more likely to recognize identity needs and make the related adjustments in behavior. This stipulation was not supported. Results revealed that high CSE and high self-monitoring had similar effects on conflict strategy choice. That is, they both were associated with relatively competent use of conflict strategies, unless the conflict was highly charged. However, low CSE/low self-monitoring adolescents clearly showed little change in behavior across minimally, moderately and highly negative affect conditions. Implications and suggestions for future research are discussed. Most notably, the influence of self-monitoring should be reassessed and improvements should be made in the manipulation of affect condition and the operationalization of the dependent variable, conflict strategy choice.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Communication; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Buller, David

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titlePredicting adolescents' responses during conflict with their parents: An explication and initial test of the Identity Maintenance Model.en_US
dc.creatorComstock, Jayne Marie.en_US
dc.contributor.authorComstock, Jayne Marie.en_US
dc.date.issued1992en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe Cognitive Communicator Characteristic Model was reformulated to form The Identity Maintenance Model (IMM), a cognitive-affective model of interpersonal interaction. The IMM postulates that cognitive structures in the form of role identity goals have considerable impact on behavioral dispositions. However, these dispositions are moderated by contextual self-esteem (CSE) in moderately or highly negative affective conditions. The model was tested in the context of parent-adolescent conflict. Study One determined the triggers of affective assessment and Study Two tested the hypotheses stipulated by the model. When applied to parent-adolescent conflict, the IMM predicted that as adolescents' CSE and negative affect increased, adolescents would use more competitive than cooperative strategies while as CSE decreased and negative affect increased, adolescents would display no change in use of cooperative relative to competitive strategies. This hypothesis was not supported. Rather, main effects for CSE and affect intensity obtained such that as CSE increased, the use of cooperative strategies increased and as affective intensity increased, the use of competitive strategies increased. It also was predicted that as contextual self-esteem decreased and negative affect increased, adolescents would use more avoidance rather than competitive approach strategies. This hypothesis also was not supported. Instead, a main effect for affective condition obtained such that as negative affect increased, the use of competitive approach moves also increased. Self-monitoring was added to the model because the IMM stipulates that high self-monitors are more likely to recognize identity needs and make the related adjustments in behavior. This stipulation was not supported. Results revealed that high CSE and high self-monitoring had similar effects on conflict strategy choice. That is, they both were associated with relatively competent use of conflict strategies, unless the conflict was highly charged. However, low CSE/low self-monitoring adolescents clearly showed little change in behavior across minimally, moderately and highly negative affect conditions. Implications and suggestions for future research are discussed. Most notably, the influence of self-monitoring should be reassessed and improvements should be made in the manipulation of affect condition and the operationalization of the dependent variable, conflict strategy choice.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineCommunicationen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorBuller, Daviden_US
dc.contributor.committeememberBailey, Williamen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberBurgoon, Judeeen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberBurgoon, Michaelen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberGamble, Wendyen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberRidley, Carlen_US
dc.identifier.proquest9223554en_US
All Items in UA Campus Repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.