Collaborative retrospective miscue analysis with middle school students.

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/185778
Title:
Collaborative retrospective miscue analysis with middle school students.
Author:
Costello, Sarah Anne
Issue Date:
1992
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Collaborative retrospective miscue analysis (CRMA) is an instructional strategy designed to engage reads in analyzing and evaluating the quality of their own reading miscues and those of their peers in a collaborative group setting. This study was concerned with discovering what happened when four middle school students engaged in discussion about their own miscues and the miscues of their peers. Before the CRMA sessions the Burke Interview was administered and a Reading Miscue Inventory using Procedure I was analyzed on each of the readers. In this way a profile of each student's strengths and weaknesses as a reader and their beliefs and attitudes about reading were ascertained. All sessions were video-taped and audio-taped to document any shifts in strategies, attitudes or beliefs about reading which occurred. Four instructional lessons were presented to introduce the concepts of miscues and the format of the study. The students, working on their own, then participated in weekly CRMA sessions during a four week period. Each student read in the group and then participated in three other CRMA sessions on the readings of their peers. The researcher returned at the end of each session to answer any questions and to discuss each session with the students. At the end of the study a final Burke Interview was administered and a Reading Miscue Inventory using Procedure I was analyzed on each of the readers. This data was compiled to create a profile of each student's development as a reader. The profile consisted of the students development as a readers before the CRMA session, during the CRMA sessions and after the completion of the CRMA session. Research findings indicated that CRMA used as an instructional strategy with middle school students facilitated a more realistic understanding of reading by those students involved and created an environment where shifts in strategies and new understandings about reading can occur. Readers moved toward a more positive and realistic perception of themselves as readers, and shifts in reading strategies occurred with a focus on constructing a meaningful text.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Teaching and Teacher Education; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Goodman, Yetta M.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleCollaborative retrospective miscue analysis with middle school students.en_US
dc.creatorCostello, Sarah Anneen_US
dc.contributor.authorCostello, Sarah Anneen_US
dc.date.issued1992en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractCollaborative retrospective miscue analysis (CRMA) is an instructional strategy designed to engage reads in analyzing and evaluating the quality of their own reading miscues and those of their peers in a collaborative group setting. This study was concerned with discovering what happened when four middle school students engaged in discussion about their own miscues and the miscues of their peers. Before the CRMA sessions the Burke Interview was administered and a Reading Miscue Inventory using Procedure I was analyzed on each of the readers. In this way a profile of each student's strengths and weaknesses as a reader and their beliefs and attitudes about reading were ascertained. All sessions were video-taped and audio-taped to document any shifts in strategies, attitudes or beliefs about reading which occurred. Four instructional lessons were presented to introduce the concepts of miscues and the format of the study. The students, working on their own, then participated in weekly CRMA sessions during a four week period. Each student read in the group and then participated in three other CRMA sessions on the readings of their peers. The researcher returned at the end of each session to answer any questions and to discuss each session with the students. At the end of the study a final Burke Interview was administered and a Reading Miscue Inventory using Procedure I was analyzed on each of the readers. This data was compiled to create a profile of each student's development as a reader. The profile consisted of the students development as a readers before the CRMA session, during the CRMA sessions and after the completion of the CRMA session. Research findings indicated that CRMA used as an instructional strategy with middle school students facilitated a more realistic understanding of reading by those students involved and created an environment where shifts in strategies and new understandings about reading can occur. Readers moved toward a more positive and realistic perception of themselves as readers, and shifts in reading strategies occurred with a focus on constructing a meaningful text.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineTeaching and Teacher Educationen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorGoodman, Yetta M.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberGoodman, Kennethen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberClark, Donald C.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberAnders, Patricia L.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberBradley, Johnen_US
dc.identifier.proquest9223547en_US
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