Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/185767
Title:
An algorithmic approach to center location and related problems.
Author:
Jaeger, Mordechai.
Issue Date:
1992
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Center location on cactus graphs. The p-center problem has been shown to be NP-hard for case of a general graph, yet polynomial algorithms exist for the case of a tree graph. Specifically, we consider "cactus graphs" where each edge is contained in at most one cycle. We show that the p-center problem on this class can be solved in polynomial time using a decomposition algorithm. We partition the graph into a set of subgraphs which are then solved sequentially. The solutions to the subgraphs are linked by a single parameter. The algorithm runs in polynomial time. Locating capacity limited centers on trees. The uncapacitated p-center problem on trees is solvable in polynomial time. We extend this result to include the case where each center can serve a limited number of customers and show that the capacitated p-center on trees can be solved in polynomial time when the capacities are identical. The algorithm consists of solving a capacitated covering problem and then using search routines to find the optimal domination radius. Center location on spheres. We discuss the unweighted center location problem. The following results are presented: (i) An O(n) time algorithm to solve the 1-center problem if the vertices are on one half of the sphere, and an O(n) time algorithm to check whether this condition holds. Both algorithms are based on presenting the problems as 3-dimensional convex programming problems with linear constraints and applying a pruning technique to find the optimum in O(n) time. (ii) An O(n$\sp3$ log n) time algorithm for the 2-center problem on the whole sphere. (iii) A reduction to show that the general p-center problem on a sphere is NP-hard. Locating hyperplanes on hypercubes. In linear regression models we are interested in locating a (d-1) dimensional hyperplane that will be as "close" as possible to existing vertices in the d-dimensional hypercube. The least squares criterion is usually applied for the linear fitting problem; while fitting according to the least absolute value ("minisum") seems to be "complicated". We solve fitting problems with the minisum criterion and present linear time algorithms when the dimension d is fixed. (Abstract shortened with permission of author.)
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Dissertations, Academic.; Graph theory.; Graph algorithms.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Systems and Industrial Engineering; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Goldberg, Jeffrey

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleAn algorithmic approach to center location and related problems.en_US
dc.creatorJaeger, Mordechai.en_US
dc.contributor.authorJaeger, Mordechai.en_US
dc.date.issued1992en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractCenter location on cactus graphs. The p-center problem has been shown to be NP-hard for case of a general graph, yet polynomial algorithms exist for the case of a tree graph. Specifically, we consider "cactus graphs" where each edge is contained in at most one cycle. We show that the p-center problem on this class can be solved in polynomial time using a decomposition algorithm. We partition the graph into a set of subgraphs which are then solved sequentially. The solutions to the subgraphs are linked by a single parameter. The algorithm runs in polynomial time. Locating capacity limited centers on trees. The uncapacitated p-center problem on trees is solvable in polynomial time. We extend this result to include the case where each center can serve a limited number of customers and show that the capacitated p-center on trees can be solved in polynomial time when the capacities are identical. The algorithm consists of solving a capacitated covering problem and then using search routines to find the optimal domination radius. Center location on spheres. We discuss the unweighted center location problem. The following results are presented: (i) An O(n) time algorithm to solve the 1-center problem if the vertices are on one half of the sphere, and an O(n) time algorithm to check whether this condition holds. Both algorithms are based on presenting the problems as 3-dimensional convex programming problems with linear constraints and applying a pruning technique to find the optimum in O(n) time. (ii) An O(n$\sp3$ log n) time algorithm for the 2-center problem on the whole sphere. (iii) A reduction to show that the general p-center problem on a sphere is NP-hard. Locating hyperplanes on hypercubes. In linear regression models we are interested in locating a (d-1) dimensional hyperplane that will be as "close" as possible to existing vertices in the d-dimensional hypercube. The least squares criterion is usually applied for the linear fitting problem; while fitting according to the least absolute value ("minisum") seems to be "complicated". We solve fitting problems with the minisum criterion and present linear time algorithms when the dimension d is fixed. (Abstract shortened with permission of author.)en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectDissertations, Academic.en_US
dc.subjectGraph theory.en_US
dc.subjectGraph algorithms.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineSystems and Industrial Engineeringen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorGoldberg, Jeffreyen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberMirchandani, P.B.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberDror, Mosheen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberWright, Arthur Larryen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberDenny, John L.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest9220694en_US
dc.identifier.oclc712295583en_US
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