Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/185762
Title:
MMPI patterns in codependency: Before and after treatment.
Author:
Prouty, Kathleen Veronica.
Issue Date:
1992
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The term "codependency" is emerging in the mental health field on a daily basis. However, along with this term comes confusion regarding what "codependency" is and how to effectively treat it. Since the term originated within the addiction studies arena, Twelve-Step programs have taken on the challenge of treating the fast-growing population of "codependents". The purpose of the present study was twofold. First, it investigated personality characteristics and traits shared by individuals having been treated for codependency issues. And second, it investigated the effects of a Twelve-Step, intensive, residential treatment program on these individuals. The subjects used in this study were identified as "codependents" due to significant, dysfunctional relationships within their lives. The research questions investigated by this study included the following: (1) What are the common demographic, personality or behavioral characteristics seen in individuals with codependency issues? And are there other identifiable factors considered contributory to treatment outcome? (2) Is intensive, short-term, residential treatment based on the Twelve-Step model, an effective approach with individuals dealing with codependency issues? (3) Do changes made during the course of treatment remain stable over time? The instruments utilized in this study to answer the above research questions included the MMPI and a Self-Evaluation Questionnaire developed by the investigator. Individuals who had been out of treatment for at least three months were solicited for their participation. Fifty subjects were used. Results showed that individuals treated for codependency tend to have low self-esteem, self-deprecation, stress, rebellion and anger, physical complaints, depression, high dependency needs, mistrust in others, and limited ego strength. They shared many diagnostic characteristics with the Self-defeating, Borderline and Dependent Personality Disorders. Treatment intervention proved to be effective in diminishing elevated levels of psychopathology. The results obtained at the time of discharge from treatment remained stable over an extended period of time.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Dissertations, Academic.; Enabling (Psychology).; Inventory for Counseling and Development.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Special Education and Rehabilitation; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Organist, James

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleMMPI patterns in codependency: Before and after treatment.en_US
dc.creatorProuty, Kathleen Veronica.en_US
dc.contributor.authorProuty, Kathleen Veronica.en_US
dc.date.issued1992en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe term "codependency" is emerging in the mental health field on a daily basis. However, along with this term comes confusion regarding what "codependency" is and how to effectively treat it. Since the term originated within the addiction studies arena, Twelve-Step programs have taken on the challenge of treating the fast-growing population of "codependents". The purpose of the present study was twofold. First, it investigated personality characteristics and traits shared by individuals having been treated for codependency issues. And second, it investigated the effects of a Twelve-Step, intensive, residential treatment program on these individuals. The subjects used in this study were identified as "codependents" due to significant, dysfunctional relationships within their lives. The research questions investigated by this study included the following: (1) What are the common demographic, personality or behavioral characteristics seen in individuals with codependency issues? And are there other identifiable factors considered contributory to treatment outcome? (2) Is intensive, short-term, residential treatment based on the Twelve-Step model, an effective approach with individuals dealing with codependency issues? (3) Do changes made during the course of treatment remain stable over time? The instruments utilized in this study to answer the above research questions included the MMPI and a Self-Evaluation Questionnaire developed by the investigator. Individuals who had been out of treatment for at least three months were solicited for their participation. Fifty subjects were used. Results showed that individuals treated for codependency tend to have low self-esteem, self-deprecation, stress, rebellion and anger, physical complaints, depression, high dependency needs, mistrust in others, and limited ego strength. They shared many diagnostic characteristics with the Self-defeating, Borderline and Dependent Personality Disorders. Treatment intervention proved to be effective in diminishing elevated levels of psychopathology. The results obtained at the time of discharge from treatment remained stable over an extended period of time.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectDissertations, Academic.en_US
dc.subjectEnabling (Psychology).en_US
dc.subjectInventory for Counseling and Development.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineSpecial Education and Rehabilitationen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorOrganist, Jamesen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberSales, Amosen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberSmith, Maeen_US
dc.identifier.proquest9220689en_US
dc.identifier.oclc712274540en_US
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