Systems of safety: Representation, order and the chaos of terrorism in modern fiction.

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/185755
Title:
Systems of safety: Representation, order and the chaos of terrorism in modern fiction.
Author:
Gatenby, Bruce.
Issue Date:
1992
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Poststructuralist literary theory has sought to question the foundations and assumptions concerning art and representation that have governed Western culture since the time of Plato. If something is not representable in language, in image, in sound, it supposedly does not exist. Thus non-representational concepts such as disorder, chaos and terror are codified, labelled, and controlled as threats to the system of representation. In order to maintain power, control, systems must repress the knowledge that the very foundation of their order (disorder, chaos, terror) are concepts at the very heart of the system itself. In effect, every system contains the elements of its own destruction, elements that are ironically empowered by the very attempt to repress their existence. Terrorism becomes a metaphor for the failure of systems such as history, philosophy, language, even civilization itself, to provide stable, absolute truths and meaning. In the history of Western metaphysics, terror, in its various manifestations, has always been a non-representable concept, both a threat to systems of order and a supposed vehicle for their change. The way that systems of power deal with the threat of terrorism has been a major subject for modern fiction; what follows is an investigation of the connections between what I call these "systems of safety," representation, terror, and modern fiction.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Literature.; Philosophy.; Psychology.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
English; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Hogle, Jerrold

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleSystems of safety: Representation, order and the chaos of terrorism in modern fiction.en_US
dc.creatorGatenby, Bruce.en_US
dc.contributor.authorGatenby, Bruce.en_US
dc.date.issued1992en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractPoststructuralist literary theory has sought to question the foundations and assumptions concerning art and representation that have governed Western culture since the time of Plato. If something is not representable in language, in image, in sound, it supposedly does not exist. Thus non-representational concepts such as disorder, chaos and terror are codified, labelled, and controlled as threats to the system of representation. In order to maintain power, control, systems must repress the knowledge that the very foundation of their order (disorder, chaos, terror) are concepts at the very heart of the system itself. In effect, every system contains the elements of its own destruction, elements that are ironically empowered by the very attempt to repress their existence. Terrorism becomes a metaphor for the failure of systems such as history, philosophy, language, even civilization itself, to provide stable, absolute truths and meaning. In the history of Western metaphysics, terror, in its various manifestations, has always been a non-representable concept, both a threat to systems of order and a supposed vehicle for their change. The way that systems of power deal with the threat of terrorism has been a major subject for modern fiction; what follows is an investigation of the connections between what I call these "systems of safety," representation, terror, and modern fiction.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectLiterature.en_US
dc.subjectPhilosophy.en_US
dc.subjectPsychology.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineEnglishen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorHogle, Jerrolden_US
dc.contributor.committeememberSchneidau, Herberten_US
dc.contributor.committeememberBowen, Rogeren_US
dc.contributor.committeememberO'Donnell, Patricken_US
dc.identifier.proquest9220683en_US
dc.identifier.oclc701556455en_US
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