Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/185753
Title:
Head injury survivorship: The family experience.
Author:
Carson, Paula Penelopy.
Issue Date:
1992
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Health professionals as well as families are being confronted with long-term care and caregiver issues that accompany the increasing incidence of individuals surviving traumatic brain injury. A sample of parents and brain-injured offspring from 20 families served as informants. The purpose of this study was to identify a qualitatively generated theory describing the parent's experience following a brain-injured child's return to the home setting. An exploratory qualitative design using grounded theory methodology was used during data collection and analysis. All the brain-injured offspring had survived a moderate-to-severe traumatic brain injury; were living with at least one parent; and were ages 17 to 34. A three-phase theory, Investing in the Comeback, was generated using grounded theory methodology. The theory's three stages, centering on fostering independence and seeking stability, describe the work of the parent living with a brain-injured offspring. The first phase, Centering On, involves the parent's focusing attention and behavior primarily on the brain-injured offspring. During Fostering Independence, the second phase, the parent initiates and maintains efforts to promote the offspring's resumption of independent functioning. The final phase, Seeking Stability, consists of the parent working to establish a regime that maintains the brain-injured offspring's optimal performance, while minimizing the strain on other family members. Theoretical sampling guided the identification of categories, properties, conditions, and consequences of each phase. Four quantitative measures supplied descriptions of sample characteristics and included demographics, cognitive deficit ratings of the child by the parent and the investigator, and the parent's perception of the family's functioning.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Head -- Wounds and injuries.; Dissertations, Academic.; Brain Injuries -- rehabilitation.; Caregivers -- psychology.; Family -- psychology.; Long-Term Care.; Parents -- psychology.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Nursing; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Verran, Joyce A.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleHead injury survivorship: The family experience.en_US
dc.creatorCarson, Paula Penelopy.en_US
dc.contributor.authorCarson, Paula Penelopy.en_US
dc.date.issued1992en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractHealth professionals as well as families are being confronted with long-term care and caregiver issues that accompany the increasing incidence of individuals surviving traumatic brain injury. A sample of parents and brain-injured offspring from 20 families served as informants. The purpose of this study was to identify a qualitatively generated theory describing the parent's experience following a brain-injured child's return to the home setting. An exploratory qualitative design using grounded theory methodology was used during data collection and analysis. All the brain-injured offspring had survived a moderate-to-severe traumatic brain injury; were living with at least one parent; and were ages 17 to 34. A three-phase theory, Investing in the Comeback, was generated using grounded theory methodology. The theory's three stages, centering on fostering independence and seeking stability, describe the work of the parent living with a brain-injured offspring. The first phase, Centering On, involves the parent's focusing attention and behavior primarily on the brain-injured offspring. During Fostering Independence, the second phase, the parent initiates and maintains efforts to promote the offspring's resumption of independent functioning. The final phase, Seeking Stability, consists of the parent working to establish a regime that maintains the brain-injured offspring's optimal performance, while minimizing the strain on other family members. Theoretical sampling guided the identification of categories, properties, conditions, and consequences of each phase. Four quantitative measures supplied descriptions of sample characteristics and included demographics, cognitive deficit ratings of the child by the parent and the investigator, and the parent's perception of the family's functioning.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectHead -- Wounds and injuries.en_US
dc.subjectDissertations, Academic.en_US
dc.subjectBrain Injuries -- rehabilitation.en_US
dc.subjectCaregivers -- psychology.en_US
dc.subjectFamily -- psychology.en_US
dc.subjectLong-Term Care.en_US
dc.subjectParents -- psychology.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineNursingen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorVerran, Joyce A.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberJones, Elaine G.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberCrosby, Leanna J.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberAhern, Geoffrey L.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberSchwartz, Gary E.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest9220681en_US
dc.identifier.oclc701368029en_US
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