Professionalism, power, and prestige: Ideology and practice in student affairs.

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/185751
Title:
Professionalism, power, and prestige: Ideology and practice in student affairs.
Author:
Hirt, Joan Bernard.
Issue Date:
1992
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
This study seeks to capture the professional ideology of student affairs administration through an examination of national policy statements published between 1937 and 1987. Both professionalization and deconstruction analytical frameworks are employed to identify the assumptions that underlie that ideology and the powerful social structures those assumptions represent. To explore how the student affairs ideology has been reflected in public expression of professional practice, national conference programs of the American College Personnel Association and the National Association of Student Personnel Administrators are examined. The conference texts from years immediately succeeding and, in one case, preceding publication of the policy statements serve as the foundation for investigating the linkages between professional ideology and professional practice in student affairs. By defining the professional ideology of student affairs administration and demonstrating how the assumptions that underlie that philosophy have been manifested in practice, I reveal how the profession has been shaped and constrained by serving and protecting certain powerful social interests.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Dissertations, Academic.; Education, Higher.; Education, History.; Student affairs administrators.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Educational Administration and Higher Education; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Rhoades, Gary D.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleProfessionalism, power, and prestige: Ideology and practice in student affairs.en_US
dc.creatorHirt, Joan Bernard.en_US
dc.contributor.authorHirt, Joan Bernard.en_US
dc.date.issued1992en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis study seeks to capture the professional ideology of student affairs administration through an examination of national policy statements published between 1937 and 1987. Both professionalization and deconstruction analytical frameworks are employed to identify the assumptions that underlie that ideology and the powerful social structures those assumptions represent. To explore how the student affairs ideology has been reflected in public expression of professional practice, national conference programs of the American College Personnel Association and the National Association of Student Personnel Administrators are examined. The conference texts from years immediately succeeding and, in one case, preceding publication of the policy statements serve as the foundation for investigating the linkages between professional ideology and professional practice in student affairs. By defining the professional ideology of student affairs administration and demonstrating how the assumptions that underlie that philosophy have been manifested in practice, I reveal how the profession has been shaped and constrained by serving and protecting certain powerful social interests.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectDissertations, Academic.en_US
dc.subjectEducation, Higher.en_US
dc.subjectEducation, History.en_US
dc.subjectStudent affairs administrators.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineEducational Administration and Higher Educationen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorRhoades, Gary D.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberPhelps, Christine E.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberMacCorquodale, Patricia L.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest9220679en_US
dc.identifier.oclc712068731en_US
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