Two contrasting explanations of involvement violations: Orientation response or affective reaction?

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/185729
Title:
Two contrasting explanations of involvement violations: Orientation response or affective reaction?
Author:
Le Poire, Beth Ann.
Issue Date:
1991
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Among theories that address the impact of variations in immediacy behaviors during ongoing interactions are nonverbal expectancy violations and discrepancy arousal theories. This study of the effects of violations of expectations on arousal and reciprocity and compensation in the medical student-patient relationship proposed that (1) nonverbal expectancy violations theory would be more valid than discrepancy arousal theory in predicting outcomes, (2) violations of expectations would be followed by an orientation response as indicated by both physiological indicators and nonverbal behaviors, and (3) physiological indicators of arousal intensity would be associated with nonverbal indicators of arousal intensity. The results indicate that neither nonverbal expectancy violations nor discrepancy arousal theory's predictions were entirely valid, as high and very high involvement (including touch and close proximity) were met with reciprocity of high involvement, while low and very low involvement (negative violations of expectations) were met with reciprocity of low involvement. Additionally, all violations of expectations were followed by increases in arousal rather than the orientation response. Finally, arousal was generally predictive of nonverbal indicators of arousal intensity, thus offering less obtrusive ways to measure arousal.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Dissertations, Academic; Psychology; Communication.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Communication; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Burgoon, Judee

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleTwo contrasting explanations of involvement violations: Orientation response or affective reaction?en_US
dc.creatorLe Poire, Beth Ann.en_US
dc.contributor.authorLe Poire, Beth Ann.en_US
dc.date.issued1991en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractAmong theories that address the impact of variations in immediacy behaviors during ongoing interactions are nonverbal expectancy violations and discrepancy arousal theories. This study of the effects of violations of expectations on arousal and reciprocity and compensation in the medical student-patient relationship proposed that (1) nonverbal expectancy violations theory would be more valid than discrepancy arousal theory in predicting outcomes, (2) violations of expectations would be followed by an orientation response as indicated by both physiological indicators and nonverbal behaviors, and (3) physiological indicators of arousal intensity would be associated with nonverbal indicators of arousal intensity. The results indicate that neither nonverbal expectancy violations nor discrepancy arousal theory's predictions were entirely valid, as high and very high involvement (including touch and close proximity) were met with reciprocity of high involvement, while low and very low involvement (negative violations of expectations) were met with reciprocity of low involvement. Additionally, all violations of expectations were followed by increases in arousal rather than the orientation response. Finally, arousal was generally predictive of nonverbal indicators of arousal intensity, thus offering less obtrusive ways to measure arousal.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectDissertations, Academicen_US
dc.subjectPsychologyen_US
dc.subjectCommunication.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineCommunicationen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorBurgoon, Judeeen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberBurgoon, Michaelen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberBailey, Billen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberSigelman, Carolen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberDaniel, Terryen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberSchwartz, Garyen_US
dc.identifier.proquest9210333en_US
dc.identifier.oclc711795269en_US
All Items in UA Campus Repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.