Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/185724
Title:
Patterns of perceived hunger in healthy adults.
Author:
Watson, Lorraine Anne.
Issue Date:
1991
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The purpose of this descriptive correlational study was to examine relationships among the sensations and cognition components of perceived hunger and four contextual correlates: physiological, emotional, environmental, and established patterns. The study examined (1) relationships among the contextual factors and components of perceived hunger, (2) differences between normal weight and overweight individuals in their perception of hunger, and (3) multivariate relationships among contextual factors and perceived hunger. The convenience sample was comprised of 359 healthy adults living in western Canada. The theoretical framework for this study emerged from the global context of the eating experience, specifically the relationship between the constructs of contextual factors and hunger. Physiological context was estimated by body mass index. Instruments used to estimate the concepts, emotional context, environmental context, established patterns, sensations, and cognition were immature instruments. Reliability and validity had been assessed in a pilot study. Statistical analysis of data included descriptive statistics, Pearson Product Moment Correlation, one-way analysis of variance, and stepwise multiple regression techniques. Approximately 58 percent of the variance in the cognitive struggle component of perceived hunger, was accounted for by the intensity of the individual's negative emotions and their degree of adiposity. Other patterns were indicative of trends. The linear composite of negative emotions, environmental factors, and the immediacy component of the established patterns accounted for 22 percent of the variance in the enhancers aspect of cognition. Nineteen percent of the variance in the sensations component was accounted for by the linear composite of the immediacy component of established patterns, environmental context, degree of adiposity, and negative emotions. Both overweight and obese individual's perception of sensations denoting hunger was significantly less intense than those experienced by normal weight individuals. The obese individual's perception of cognitive struggle was significantly more intense than that experienced by underweight, normal weight, or overweight individuals. Overweight individuals experienced cognitive struggle with significantly greater intensity than did underweight individuals. Nurses in clinical settings may use the findings for assessing and formulating nursing interventions related to eating behavior.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Behavior; Eating; Appetite; Hunger; Perception
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Nursing; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Woodtli, Anne

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titlePatterns of perceived hunger in healthy adults.en_US
dc.creatorWatson, Lorraine Anne.en_US
dc.contributor.authorWatson, Lorraine Anne.en_US
dc.date.issued1991en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe purpose of this descriptive correlational study was to examine relationships among the sensations and cognition components of perceived hunger and four contextual correlates: physiological, emotional, environmental, and established patterns. The study examined (1) relationships among the contextual factors and components of perceived hunger, (2) differences between normal weight and overweight individuals in their perception of hunger, and (3) multivariate relationships among contextual factors and perceived hunger. The convenience sample was comprised of 359 healthy adults living in western Canada. The theoretical framework for this study emerged from the global context of the eating experience, specifically the relationship between the constructs of contextual factors and hunger. Physiological context was estimated by body mass index. Instruments used to estimate the concepts, emotional context, environmental context, established patterns, sensations, and cognition were immature instruments. Reliability and validity had been assessed in a pilot study. Statistical analysis of data included descriptive statistics, Pearson Product Moment Correlation, one-way analysis of variance, and stepwise multiple regression techniques. Approximately 58 percent of the variance in the cognitive struggle component of perceived hunger, was accounted for by the intensity of the individual's negative emotions and their degree of adiposity. Other patterns were indicative of trends. The linear composite of negative emotions, environmental factors, and the immediacy component of the established patterns accounted for 22 percent of the variance in the enhancers aspect of cognition. Nineteen percent of the variance in the sensations component was accounted for by the linear composite of the immediacy component of established patterns, environmental context, degree of adiposity, and negative emotions. Both overweight and obese individual's perception of sensations denoting hunger was significantly less intense than those experienced by normal weight individuals. The obese individual's perception of cognitive struggle was significantly more intense than that experienced by underweight, normal weight, or overweight individuals. Overweight individuals experienced cognitive struggle with significantly greater intensity than did underweight individuals. Nurses in clinical settings may use the findings for assessing and formulating nursing interventions related to eating behavior.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectBehavioren_US
dc.subjectEatingen_US
dc.subjectAppetiteen_US
dc.subjectHungeren_US
dc.subjectPerceptionen_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineNursingen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorWoodtli, Anneen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberVerran, Joyce A.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberHaase, Joanen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberKhilstrom, Johnen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberRidley, Carlen_US
dc.identifier.proquest9210329en_US
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