Seasonal patterns in physical growth of well-nourished children in relation to illnesses and nutrient intake.

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/185699
Title:
Seasonal patterns in physical growth of well-nourished children in relation to illnesses and nutrient intake.
Author:
Khan, Awal Dad.
Issue Date:
1991
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Seasonal patterns of weight and length velocities were explored in a group of fifty-five preschoolers. The study was conducted in Tucson, a city of the southwestern state of Arizona, during the period 1986 to 1988. Anthropometric data (weight, length and arm circumference) were collected prospectively over a 10 month period using a mixed longitudinal design. Anthropometric measurements were taken monthly within seven days of date of birth. In addition, food intake records for three days a month and semimonthly morbidity records were collected by daily maternal or caretaker's calendar recordings. Temperature and sunlight records were gathered from climatological data archived by the United States Department of Commerce. Descriptive statistics, analysis of covariance and periodic regression methods were used to analyze the data. Weight and length-for-age were comparable at all ages to the NCHS (National Center for Health Statistics) reference population. Periodic regression models revealed a significant seasonal pattern in length velocity. Weight velocity did not show any seasonal pattern. Respiratory illness, diarrheal disease and otitis media showed seasonal patterns, with higher prevalence of respiratory illness and otitis media in winter and diarrheal illness in summer. Analysis of covariance models also showed significant seasonal patterns of respiratory and diarrheal illnesses. Only diarrheal illness was significantly and negatively associated with weight velocity. Similar analyses showed no seasonal patterns in nutrient intakes. When periodic regression models were used to predict nutrient intakes, only vitamin C intake showed a seasonal pattern. Hours of sunlight did not influence seasonal pattern of length velocity. Environmental temperature had a significant influence on the seasonal pattern of length velocity, but not on weight velocity. The lack of a modifying effect of sunlight on length velocity might be related to lower month to month variation. Neither respiratory and diarrheal illnesses nor nutrient intakes contributed significantly to the seasonal patterns of weight and length velocity.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Dissertations, Academic; Nutrition; Children -- Growth.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Nutritional Sciences; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Harrison, Gail G.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleSeasonal patterns in physical growth of well-nourished children in relation to illnesses and nutrient intake.en_US
dc.creatorKhan, Awal Dad.en_US
dc.contributor.authorKhan, Awal Dad.en_US
dc.date.issued1991en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractSeasonal patterns of weight and length velocities were explored in a group of fifty-five preschoolers. The study was conducted in Tucson, a city of the southwestern state of Arizona, during the period 1986 to 1988. Anthropometric data (weight, length and arm circumference) were collected prospectively over a 10 month period using a mixed longitudinal design. Anthropometric measurements were taken monthly within seven days of date of birth. In addition, food intake records for three days a month and semimonthly morbidity records were collected by daily maternal or caretaker's calendar recordings. Temperature and sunlight records were gathered from climatological data archived by the United States Department of Commerce. Descriptive statistics, analysis of covariance and periodic regression methods were used to analyze the data. Weight and length-for-age were comparable at all ages to the NCHS (National Center for Health Statistics) reference population. Periodic regression models revealed a significant seasonal pattern in length velocity. Weight velocity did not show any seasonal pattern. Respiratory illness, diarrheal disease and otitis media showed seasonal patterns, with higher prevalence of respiratory illness and otitis media in winter and diarrheal illness in summer. Analysis of covariance models also showed significant seasonal patterns of respiratory and diarrheal illnesses. Only diarrheal illness was significantly and negatively associated with weight velocity. Similar analyses showed no seasonal patterns in nutrient intakes. When periodic regression models were used to predict nutrient intakes, only vitamin C intake showed a seasonal pattern. Hours of sunlight did not influence seasonal pattern of length velocity. Environmental temperature had a significant influence on the seasonal pattern of length velocity, but not on weight velocity. The lack of a modifying effect of sunlight on length velocity might be related to lower month to month variation. Neither respiratory and diarrheal illnesses nor nutrient intakes contributed significantly to the seasonal patterns of weight and length velocity.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectDissertations, Academicen_US
dc.subjectNutritionen_US
dc.subjectChildren -- Growth.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineNutritional Sciencesen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorHarrison, Gail G.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberRitenbaugh, Cheryl K.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberBrannon, Patsy M.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberZegura, Stephen L.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberInhorn, Marcia C.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest9210305en_US
dc.identifier.oclc711907396en_US
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