Relationships among social interest, social problem-solving, life events, and depression: A structural equation analysis.

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/185677
Title:
Relationships among social interest, social problem-solving, life events, and depression: A structural equation analysis.
Author:
Dessalegn, Semret
Issue Date:
1991
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
This study used the Factor Analytic Structural Equations Model (FASEM) to test the plausibility of two nested causal models of depression, the Full Model and Restricted Model, in a 2-month prospective study. Subjects were 103 undergraduate students. The Full Model deals with the causal relations among indices of life events, social interest, social problem solving, and depression across time. In contrast, causal relations among indices of life events and depression across time were assessed by the Restricted Model. Both models provided acceptable representations of the observed data. Although both models were accepted by 4 goodness-of-fit criteria, including the Chi-square goodness-of-fit test, the Full Model suggests the specification of more causal factors clarifies the effect of social interest and social problem solving on depression, enables a more complete assessment of depression, and is consistent with a pluralistic view of depression (Craighead, Kennedy, Raczynski, & Dow, 1984). In the present study, two questions were addressed: (1) the causal relation between social interest and social problem solving on depression, and (2) the magnitude of the causal impact of social interest and social problem solving on depression. Contrary to predictions, significant paths from both social interest and social problem solving to depression were not found. However, consistent with predictions, social interest had a stronger effect on depression than social problem solving. Directions for future research, theoretical implications, and possible applications of the Full Model are discussed.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Dissertations, Academic.; Social psychology.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Psychology; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Greenberg, J.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleRelationships among social interest, social problem-solving, life events, and depression: A structural equation analysis.en_US
dc.creatorDessalegn, Semreten_US
dc.contributor.authorDessalegn, Semreten_US
dc.date.issued1991en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis study used the Factor Analytic Structural Equations Model (FASEM) to test the plausibility of two nested causal models of depression, the Full Model and Restricted Model, in a 2-month prospective study. Subjects were 103 undergraduate students. The Full Model deals with the causal relations among indices of life events, social interest, social problem solving, and depression across time. In contrast, causal relations among indices of life events and depression across time were assessed by the Restricted Model. Both models provided acceptable representations of the observed data. Although both models were accepted by 4 goodness-of-fit criteria, including the Chi-square goodness-of-fit test, the Full Model suggests the specification of more causal factors clarifies the effect of social interest and social problem solving on depression, enables a more complete assessment of depression, and is consistent with a pluralistic view of depression (Craighead, Kennedy, Raczynski, & Dow, 1984). In the present study, two questions were addressed: (1) the causal relation between social interest and social problem solving on depression, and (2) the magnitude of the causal impact of social interest and social problem solving on depression. Contrary to predictions, significant paths from both social interest and social problem solving to depression were not found. However, consistent with predictions, social interest had a stronger effect on depression than social problem solving. Directions for future research, theoretical implications, and possible applications of the Full Model are discussed.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectDissertations, Academic.en_US
dc.subjectSocial psychology.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplinePsychologyen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorGreenberg, J.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberSechrest, L.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberIttelson, W.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberBootzin, Richarden_US
dc.contributor.committeememberArkowitz, Harold S.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest9210285en_US
dc.identifier.oclc712069302en_US
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