Recovering the hydrocarbon distributions in Saturn's upper atmosphere through mathematical inversion.

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/185665
Title:
Recovering the hydrocarbon distributions in Saturn's upper atmosphere through mathematical inversion.
Author:
Feng, Da Sheng.
Issue Date:
1991
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The spacecraft Voyager 2 UVS occultation experiments measured the ultraviolet absorption properties of the upper atmosphere of Saturn. In the extreme-ultraviolet wavelength region from 1300 Å to 1700 Å, CH₄, C₂H₂, C₂H₄, C₂H₆ and C₄H₂ are the major absorbers in the Saturnian upper atmosphere. In this dissertation, using the linear constrained matrix method, the Saturnian stellar EUV occultation data has been inverted. This results in, for the first time, the number density distributions of the 5 major hydrocarbons over an altitude range from 1030 km to 630 km. The synthetic transmission curves based on these inverted distributions exhibit excellent agreement with the observed transmission curves in all usable wavelength channels. There are two major findings in the Saturnian upper atmosphere from the inverted hydrocarbon profiles: (1) The number densities of CH₄ and C₂H₆ are comparable. It is even likely that there is more C₂H₆ than CH₄ in Saturn's upper atmosphere between 1000 km and 800 km. (2) C₂H₄, rather than C₂H₂, is the 3rd most abundant hydrocarbon. From 1000 km down to 600 km, the number density of C₂H₄ is greater than the number density of C₂H₂. These two findings are generally in conflict with the expectations from photochemical models for the atmospheres of the giant planets.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Dissertations, Academic; Atmospheric physics; Astrophysics; Astronomy.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Atmospheric Sciences; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Herman, Benjamin M.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleRecovering the hydrocarbon distributions in Saturn's upper atmosphere through mathematical inversion.en_US
dc.creatorFeng, Da Sheng.en_US
dc.contributor.authorFeng, Da Sheng.en_US
dc.date.issued1991en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe spacecraft Voyager 2 UVS occultation experiments measured the ultraviolet absorption properties of the upper atmosphere of Saturn. In the extreme-ultraviolet wavelength region from 1300 Å to 1700 Å, CH₄, C₂H₂, C₂H₄, C₂H₆ and C₄H₂ are the major absorbers in the Saturnian upper atmosphere. In this dissertation, using the linear constrained matrix method, the Saturnian stellar EUV occultation data has been inverted. This results in, for the first time, the number density distributions of the 5 major hydrocarbons over an altitude range from 1030 km to 630 km. The synthetic transmission curves based on these inverted distributions exhibit excellent agreement with the observed transmission curves in all usable wavelength channels. There are two major findings in the Saturnian upper atmosphere from the inverted hydrocarbon profiles: (1) The number densities of CH₄ and C₂H₆ are comparable. It is even likely that there is more C₂H₆ than CH₄ in Saturn's upper atmosphere between 1000 km and 800 km. (2) C₂H₄, rather than C₂H₂, is the 3rd most abundant hydrocarbon. From 1000 km down to 600 km, the number density of C₂H₄ is greater than the number density of C₂H₂. These two findings are generally in conflict with the expectations from photochemical models for the atmospheres of the giant planets.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectDissertations, Academicen_US
dc.subjectAtmospheric physicsen_US
dc.subjectAstrophysicsen_US
dc.subjectAstronomy.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineAtmospheric Sciencesen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorHerman, Benjamin M.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberReagen, John A.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberSellers, William D.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberStaley, Dean O.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest9210273en_US
dc.identifier.oclc711888835en_US
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