Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/185646
Title:
Teachers' classroom knowledge as curriculum script.
Author:
Anders, Deborah Ann.
Issue Date:
1991
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
This study was designed to capture and portray a teacher's classroom knowledge as curriculum script. The task framework suggested by Doyle (1980, 1983, 1986) was combined with the descriptions of the activity organization and materials used to convey the content, to examine activities embedded within classroom events in order to determine the patterns which might suggest the content and character of the teacher's knowledge for one content area, mathematics. The teacher taught two math groups each week: a second grade, homogeneous group three days per week, and her combination second and third grade homeroom group two days each week. Data were collected over a period of six months. Daily observations were made in two phases: all day every day for the first week of school and every day during the one-hour math period for the first half of the school year. Five interviews were conducted with the teacher: one before the school year began, three during the first half of the school year, and one six weeks after the last observations were made. The data for this study were analyzed in four stages. First, task descriptions were constructed daily from the field notes that were taken during classroom observations and expanded shortly thereafter. Second, task descriptions for each unit of instruction were analyzed to generate summary statements which were used to compose letters to the teacher. Third, all task descriptions were analyzed to reveal patterns within and across the two math groups. Finally, the letters were sent to the teacher in advance of each interview, the interviews were audio-recorded and transcribed, then the protocols were analyzed to reveal themes in the teacher's dialogue about her classroom knowledge. This analysis resulted in the construction of a number of propositions which were then used in conjunction with the findings from the task description analysis to present the content, functions of, and influences on the teacher's curriculum script. The curriculum script model constructed from the findings of this study seems to account for both the complexity of teachers' knowledge and the complexity of the classroom context.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Dissertations, Academic; Education, Elementary
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Teaching and Teacher Education; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Carter, Kathy

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleTeachers' classroom knowledge as curriculum script.en_US
dc.creatorAnders, Deborah Ann.en_US
dc.contributor.authorAnders, Deborah Ann.en_US
dc.date.issued1991en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis study was designed to capture and portray a teacher's classroom knowledge as curriculum script. The task framework suggested by Doyle (1980, 1983, 1986) was combined with the descriptions of the activity organization and materials used to convey the content, to examine activities embedded within classroom events in order to determine the patterns which might suggest the content and character of the teacher's knowledge for one content area, mathematics. The teacher taught two math groups each week: a second grade, homogeneous group three days per week, and her combination second and third grade homeroom group two days each week. Data were collected over a period of six months. Daily observations were made in two phases: all day every day for the first week of school and every day during the one-hour math period for the first half of the school year. Five interviews were conducted with the teacher: one before the school year began, three during the first half of the school year, and one six weeks after the last observations were made. The data for this study were analyzed in four stages. First, task descriptions were constructed daily from the field notes that were taken during classroom observations and expanded shortly thereafter. Second, task descriptions for each unit of instruction were analyzed to generate summary statements which were used to compose letters to the teacher. Third, all task descriptions were analyzed to reveal patterns within and across the two math groups. Finally, the letters were sent to the teacher in advance of each interview, the interviews were audio-recorded and transcribed, then the protocols were analyzed to reveal themes in the teacher's dialogue about her classroom knowledge. This analysis resulted in the construction of a number of propositions which were then used in conjunction with the findings from the task description analysis to present the content, functions of, and influences on the teacher's curriculum script. The curriculum script model constructed from the findings of this study seems to account for both the complexity of teachers' knowledge and the complexity of the classroom context.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectDissertations, Academicen_US
dc.subjectEducation, Elementaryen_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineTeaching and Teacher Educationen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorCarter, Kathyen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberRichardson, Virginiaen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberDoyle, Walteren_US
dc.identifier.proquest9208046en_US
dc.identifier.oclc711794978en_US
All Items in UA Campus Repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.