The effect of variation among brands on product category similarity judgment.

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/185642
Title:
The effect of variation among brands on product category similarity judgment.
Author:
Yoo, Changjo.
Issue Date:
1991
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The effects of product category similarity on marketing variables (e.g., success of brand extension or choice strategies) has recently emerged as an important topic in the marketing literature. However, this research stream has rarely specified how consumers perceive similarity between product categories. This paper investigates the factors that influence consumers' similarity judgments. A Two-Process model, which integrates recent views on product category similarity in marketing and theories and findings on similarity in psychology, is developed. The Two-Process Model for product category judgments basically proposes that consumers first look for a comparable attribute and subsequently use that attribute for their similarity judgments. Based on this Two-Process Model, it is hypothesized that distance between product categories and variation among brands influence product category similarity judgments. Interactions between distance and variation are also hypothesized. Study results show that variation among brands as well as distance strongly influence the similarity judgments. Moreover, the effects of variation among brands depends on the distance. In addition, the effects of variation were significant only when considerable change of overlap in perceptual distribution (which was controlled by interpoint distance) could be noticed by subjects. Comparisons of the results of the two studies (Study 1 and Study 2) lead us to conclude that subjects look for a comparable attribute and use it for their similarity judgments. Supplemental measures such as similarity judgments between brands offer further support for the Two-Process Model.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Business administration research and education.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Business Administration; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Nakamoto, Kent; MacInnis, Deborah J.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleThe effect of variation among brands on product category similarity judgment.en_US
dc.creatorYoo, Changjo.en_US
dc.contributor.authorYoo, Changjo.en_US
dc.date.issued1991en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe effects of product category similarity on marketing variables (e.g., success of brand extension or choice strategies) has recently emerged as an important topic in the marketing literature. However, this research stream has rarely specified how consumers perceive similarity between product categories. This paper investigates the factors that influence consumers' similarity judgments. A Two-Process model, which integrates recent views on product category similarity in marketing and theories and findings on similarity in psychology, is developed. The Two-Process Model for product category judgments basically proposes that consumers first look for a comparable attribute and subsequently use that attribute for their similarity judgments. Based on this Two-Process Model, it is hypothesized that distance between product categories and variation among brands influence product category similarity judgments. Interactions between distance and variation are also hypothesized. Study results show that variation among brands as well as distance strongly influence the similarity judgments. Moreover, the effects of variation among brands depends on the distance. In addition, the effects of variation were significant only when considerable change of overlap in perceptual distribution (which was controlled by interpoint distance) could be noticed by subjects. Comparisons of the results of the two studies (Study 1 and Study 2) lead us to conclude that subjects look for a comparable attribute and use it for their similarity judgments. Supplemental measures such as similarity judgments between brands offer further support for the Two-Process Model.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectBusiness administration research and education.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineBusiness Administrationen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorNakamoto, Kenten_US
dc.contributor.advisorMacInnis, Deborah J.-
dc.contributor.committeememberPuto, Christopheren_US
dc.contributor.committeememberPeterson, Maryen_US
dc.identifier.proquest9208040en_US
dc.identifier.oclc703878982en_US
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