Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/185627
Title:
A pentad analysis: Jeane J. Kirkpatrick at the United Nations.
Author:
Miles, Suzanne Laura.
Issue Date:
1991
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The present study is a content analysis of thirteen speeches presented by Jeane Jordan Kirkpatrick while she served as the United States Permanent Representative to the United Nations from 1981-1985. Seven of the speeches were made before the Security Council, five before the General Assembly, and once before the Economic and Social Council. Kenneth Burke's pentadic analysis provides a highly appropriate methodology through which to view Kirkpatrick's United Nations speeches. It assumes the existence and use of written texts. The dramatistic metaphor, which constitutes the basis of Burke's critical model, is widely used by political scientists and sociologists, as well as by rhetorical critics. The pentad serves as an organizing scheme to understand, explain, and to evaluate what speakers do and why they do it. The analyses indicate that Kirkpatrick associates most often with a pragmatic line of argument, incorporating a conservative view of the world. This is revealed through her frequent use of Burke's act-agency and agent-agency ratios. She weaves examples of proven occurrences throughout her rhetoric to support her conservative stance on most issues addressed during this period. In addition, the analysis reveal that Kirkpatrick's motive for speaking is to show support for United States allies, in particular, Israel. The appendix includes data from a DICTION analysis of three of Kirkpatrick's speeches. These results are inconclusive. This study serves as a base from which to branch out to continue further research on Kirkpatrick, other women speakers and other Permanent Representatives. In addition, the study can serve as a spring board for a comparison of political speakers in general.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Political oratory; Political science -- Research.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Communication; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Ewbank, Henry L.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleA pentad analysis: Jeane J. Kirkpatrick at the United Nations.en_US
dc.creatorMiles, Suzanne Laura.en_US
dc.contributor.authorMiles, Suzanne Laura.en_US
dc.date.issued1991en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe present study is a content analysis of thirteen speeches presented by Jeane Jordan Kirkpatrick while she served as the United States Permanent Representative to the United Nations from 1981-1985. Seven of the speeches were made before the Security Council, five before the General Assembly, and once before the Economic and Social Council. Kenneth Burke's pentadic analysis provides a highly appropriate methodology through which to view Kirkpatrick's United Nations speeches. It assumes the existence and use of written texts. The dramatistic metaphor, which constitutes the basis of Burke's critical model, is widely used by political scientists and sociologists, as well as by rhetorical critics. The pentad serves as an organizing scheme to understand, explain, and to evaluate what speakers do and why they do it. The analyses indicate that Kirkpatrick associates most often with a pragmatic line of argument, incorporating a conservative view of the world. This is revealed through her frequent use of Burke's act-agency and agent-agency ratios. She weaves examples of proven occurrences throughout her rhetoric to support her conservative stance on most issues addressed during this period. In addition, the analysis reveal that Kirkpatrick's motive for speaking is to show support for United States allies, in particular, Israel. The appendix includes data from a DICTION analysis of three of Kirkpatrick's speeches. These results are inconclusive. This study serves as a base from which to branch out to continue further research on Kirkpatrick, other women speakers and other Permanent Representatives. In addition, the study can serve as a spring board for a comparison of political speakers in general.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectPolitical oratoryen_US
dc.subjectPolitical science -- Research.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineCommunicationen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorEwbank, Henry L.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberWilliams, David A.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberKing, Andrew A.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest9208026en_US
dc.identifier.oclc703155176en_US
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