Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/185617
Title:
Hyperventilation symptoms and their relationship to panic.
Author:
Shapiro, Cheri Joan.
Issue Date:
1991
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Symptom overlap between the Hyperventilation Syndrome (HVS) and Panic Disorder (PD) has been noted by many investigators; however, the reasons for this association are unclear. By following 50 college subjects (36 female and 14 male) who displayed extremely high rates of hyperventilation symptoms over four-week to nine-month intervals, symptom stability patterns as well as the relationship to panic attacks were examined. Rates of overlap between hyperventilation symptoms and panic attacks was 66% in the current sample. Furthermore, 4 of 50 (8%) of panic-free subjects developed panic attacks during the course of the investigation. Although the frequency of hyperventilation symptoms decreased over time for most subjects, many individuals continued to be symptomatic over time. One potential mechanism of association between hyperventilation and panic (i.e., focus on either somatic or somatic plus cognitive symptoms of hyperventilation) was not supported, and several personality variables (repression and anxiety sensitivity) were not found to influence the relationship between hyperventilation and panic. Finally, measurement issues related to a hyperventilation symptom questionnaire were addressed. The two-week test-retest reliability was .79. Evaluation of the validity of the HVQ by assessing end-tidal CO₂ levels of 30 subjects resulted in no significant differences between high and low scorers. Implications of the present findings are discussed in light of current theoretical models of the relationship between HVS and PD.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Dissertations, Academic; Clinical psychology
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Psychology; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Sechrest, Lee

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleHyperventilation symptoms and their relationship to panic.en_US
dc.creatorShapiro, Cheri Joan.en_US
dc.contributor.authorShapiro, Cheri Joan.en_US
dc.date.issued1991en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractSymptom overlap between the Hyperventilation Syndrome (HVS) and Panic Disorder (PD) has been noted by many investigators; however, the reasons for this association are unclear. By following 50 college subjects (36 female and 14 male) who displayed extremely high rates of hyperventilation symptoms over four-week to nine-month intervals, symptom stability patterns as well as the relationship to panic attacks were examined. Rates of overlap between hyperventilation symptoms and panic attacks was 66% in the current sample. Furthermore, 4 of 50 (8%) of panic-free subjects developed panic attacks during the course of the investigation. Although the frequency of hyperventilation symptoms decreased over time for most subjects, many individuals continued to be symptomatic over time. One potential mechanism of association between hyperventilation and panic (i.e., focus on either somatic or somatic plus cognitive symptoms of hyperventilation) was not supported, and several personality variables (repression and anxiety sensitivity) were not found to influence the relationship between hyperventilation and panic. Finally, measurement issues related to a hyperventilation symptom questionnaire were addressed. The two-week test-retest reliability was .79. Evaluation of the validity of the HVQ by assessing end-tidal CO₂ levels of 30 subjects resulted in no significant differences between high and low scorers. Implications of the present findings are discussed in light of current theoretical models of the relationship between HVS and PD.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectDissertations, Academicen_US
dc.subjectClinical psychologyen_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplinePsychologyen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorSechrest, Leeen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberBootzin, Richarden_US
dc.contributor.committeememberLansing, Roberten_US
dc.contributor.committeememberRosser, Rosemaryen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberSigelman, Carol K.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest9202088en_US
dc.identifier.oclc711793213en_US
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