Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/185608
Title:
Learning the curriculum as a classroom event.
Author:
Gonzalez, Luz Elva.
Issue Date:
1991
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The purpose of this study was to examine the evolving event-structured knowledge of one student teacher in a second grade classroom containing a diverse population of students. His understandings, interpretations, and reflections were documented before, during, and after enactment of units of content in the classroom. Weekly interviews designed to elicit the student teacher's "well-remembered events" provided the primary data for the study. In addition, daily observations by the researcher supplemented analysis of the student teacher's interpretations. Interviews with the cooperating teacher to establish an understanding of the context in which the student teacher was learning to teach completed data collection. Findings indicated that the student teacher faced major difficulties in the areas of instructional time and unit context. Based on the demands of the curriculum, students, and cooperating teacher and his interpretations of difficulties encountered, the student teacher concluded that the second grade curriculum was above grade level, that it was constraining on planning and teaching, and that it contained discrepancies. The student teacher resolved these difficulties by moving students back in the curriculum or by condensing or eliminating portions of the curriculum before and during the enactment of content. Analysis of the data suggests that other factors may have contributed to the problems faced by the student teacher in learning to teach. For example, he reported having limited knowledge of the curriculum as well as teaching methods. These limitations may have affected the struggles he experienced as he learned, represented, and enacted the curriculum with a group of students in a complex environment.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Dissertations, Academic; Teachers -- Training of; Teaching.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Teaching and Teacher Education; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Doyle, Walter

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleLearning the curriculum as a classroom event.en_US
dc.creatorGonzalez, Luz Elva.en_US
dc.contributor.authorGonzalez, Luz Elva.en_US
dc.date.issued1991en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe purpose of this study was to examine the evolving event-structured knowledge of one student teacher in a second grade classroom containing a diverse population of students. His understandings, interpretations, and reflections were documented before, during, and after enactment of units of content in the classroom. Weekly interviews designed to elicit the student teacher's "well-remembered events" provided the primary data for the study. In addition, daily observations by the researcher supplemented analysis of the student teacher's interpretations. Interviews with the cooperating teacher to establish an understanding of the context in which the student teacher was learning to teach completed data collection. Findings indicated that the student teacher faced major difficulties in the areas of instructional time and unit context. Based on the demands of the curriculum, students, and cooperating teacher and his interpretations of difficulties encountered, the student teacher concluded that the second grade curriculum was above grade level, that it was constraining on planning and teaching, and that it contained discrepancies. The student teacher resolved these difficulties by moving students back in the curriculum or by condensing or eliminating portions of the curriculum before and during the enactment of content. Analysis of the data suggests that other factors may have contributed to the problems faced by the student teacher in learning to teach. For example, he reported having limited knowledge of the curriculum as well as teaching methods. These limitations may have affected the struggles he experienced as he learned, represented, and enacted the curriculum with a group of students in a complex environment.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectDissertations, Academicen_US
dc.subjectTeachers -- Training ofen_US
dc.subjectTeaching.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineTeaching and Teacher Educationen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorDoyle, Walteren_US
dc.contributor.committeememberCarter, Kathyen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberRichardson, Virginiaen_US
dc.identifier.proquest9202079en_US
dc.identifier.oclc711787053en_US
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