A MEDICAL PARADIGM SHIFT AMONG PHYSICIANS: ACCEPTANCE OF HEALTH EDUCATION AND WELLNESS.

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/185604
Title:
A MEDICAL PARADIGM SHIFT AMONG PHYSICIANS: ACCEPTANCE OF HEALTH EDUCATION AND WELLNESS.
Author:
SCHLOSS, ERNEST PETER.
Issue Date:
1983
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The purpose of the study was to determine whether it was possible to predict the socio-demographic characteristics of physicians who adopt a new paradigm in medicine, wellness. A major objective of the research was to test the "marginal man" hypothesis. The literature suggested that there are at least three types of innovations: technological, organizational, and paradigmatic. Literature on the diffusion of innovations in medicine showed that high status physicians adopt technical innovations; more marginal, particularly young physicians and those of a liberal political orientation, most often adopt organizational innovations. Few studies dealing with paradigmatic innovations were found. Historical evidence supports the notion that family practitioners might be more accepting of the new paradigm. Physicians in Tucson, Arizona were surveyed concerning their attitudes and practices in the areas of health education and wellness, examples of the new paradigm in medicine. They were also asked about hospital-based health education services and competition between physicians and hospitals, examples of organizational innovation. The analyses revealed that family practitioners, women and government physicians were most supportive of wellness, affirming the research hypothesis and the "marginal man" hypothesis. The analysis also suggested that younger and more liberal physicians were more favorably disposed toward hospital involvement in health education. Liberal physicians were also not concerned about competition in health education service. These findings are similar to those found by other researchers of organizational innovations in medical care. Several methodological problems were noted, which render the findings suggestive rather than conclusive. The findings do suggest, however, that physician resistance to wellness will continue because of a medical paradigm conflict.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Medicine, Preventive.; Physicians -- Psychology.; Hospitals -- Health promotion services.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Educational Foundations and Administration; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleA MEDICAL PARADIGM SHIFT AMONG PHYSICIANS: ACCEPTANCE OF HEALTH EDUCATION AND WELLNESS.en_US
dc.creatorSCHLOSS, ERNEST PETER.en_US
dc.contributor.authorSCHLOSS, ERNEST PETER.en_US
dc.date.issued1983en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe purpose of the study was to determine whether it was possible to predict the socio-demographic characteristics of physicians who adopt a new paradigm in medicine, wellness. A major objective of the research was to test the "marginal man" hypothesis. The literature suggested that there are at least three types of innovations: technological, organizational, and paradigmatic. Literature on the diffusion of innovations in medicine showed that high status physicians adopt technical innovations; more marginal, particularly young physicians and those of a liberal political orientation, most often adopt organizational innovations. Few studies dealing with paradigmatic innovations were found. Historical evidence supports the notion that family practitioners might be more accepting of the new paradigm. Physicians in Tucson, Arizona were surveyed concerning their attitudes and practices in the areas of health education and wellness, examples of the new paradigm in medicine. They were also asked about hospital-based health education services and competition between physicians and hospitals, examples of organizational innovation. The analyses revealed that family practitioners, women and government physicians were most supportive of wellness, affirming the research hypothesis and the "marginal man" hypothesis. The analysis also suggested that younger and more liberal physicians were more favorably disposed toward hospital involvement in health education. Liberal physicians were also not concerned about competition in health education service. These findings are similar to those found by other researchers of organizational innovations in medical care. Several methodological problems were noted, which render the findings suggestive rather than conclusive. The findings do suggest, however, that physician resistance to wellness will continue because of a medical paradigm conflict.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectMedicine, Preventive.en_US
dc.subjectPhysicians -- Psychology.en_US
dc.subjectHospitals -- Health promotion services.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineEducational Foundations and Administrationen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberChilcott, John B.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberBlake, Royen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberLevy, Jerrolden_US
dc.identifier.proquest8311416en_US
dc.identifier.oclc688320362en_US
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