Supporting joint application development with electronic meeting systems: A field study.

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/185603
Title:
Supporting joint application development with electronic meeting systems: A field study.
Author:
Carmel, Erran.
Issue Date:
1991
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
JAD (Joint Application Development) is a meeting-centered methodology used to address the problem of getting users involved in the systems development process. Industry has used the JAD approach to develop systems for over a decade, predominantly for in-house software applications. Electronic Meeting Systems (EMS) are networked software systems that support meetings through a variety of software tools. The combination of the two--JAD and EMS--creates Electronic JAD (E-JAD). A field study was conducted to investigate whether applying EMS to JAD benefits the systems development process. The field study compared five traditional JAD sessions to six E-JAD sessions. All E-JAD sessions made use of the University of Arizona GroupSystems EMS. All sessions involved actual software development efforts conducted in a half dozen organizations and were all held in a face-to-face setting. There was some evidence that the E-JAD approach was beneficial as compared to traditional JAD techniques on the variables of efficiency and equalizing participation and influence. Traditional JAD sessions showed benefits over E-JAD in handling conflicts (particularly in resolving conflicts) and in enforcing a higher degree of structure. Neither of the approaches dominated on all criteria, hence an examination of E-JAD's weaknesses identifies two key areas for improvement: fit of GroupSystems tools to tasks (with discussion of divergence and convergence), and greater involvement of the session facilitator. Other constructs analyzed and discussed are: completeness, creativity, satisfaction, IS-user bonding, user expectations, users' mental models, JAD costs, group size, and planning activities.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Dissertations, Academic; Application software; Psychology, Industrial.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Business Administration; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
George, Joey F.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleSupporting joint application development with electronic meeting systems: A field study.en_US
dc.creatorCarmel, Erran.en_US
dc.contributor.authorCarmel, Erran.en_US
dc.date.issued1991en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractJAD (Joint Application Development) is a meeting-centered methodology used to address the problem of getting users involved in the systems development process. Industry has used the JAD approach to develop systems for over a decade, predominantly for in-house software applications. Electronic Meeting Systems (EMS) are networked software systems that support meetings through a variety of software tools. The combination of the two--JAD and EMS--creates Electronic JAD (E-JAD). A field study was conducted to investigate whether applying EMS to JAD benefits the systems development process. The field study compared five traditional JAD sessions to six E-JAD sessions. All E-JAD sessions made use of the University of Arizona GroupSystems EMS. All sessions involved actual software development efforts conducted in a half dozen organizations and were all held in a face-to-face setting. There was some evidence that the E-JAD approach was beneficial as compared to traditional JAD techniques on the variables of efficiency and equalizing participation and influence. Traditional JAD sessions showed benefits over E-JAD in handling conflicts (particularly in resolving conflicts) and in enforcing a higher degree of structure. Neither of the approaches dominated on all criteria, hence an examination of E-JAD's weaknesses identifies two key areas for improvement: fit of GroupSystems tools to tasks (with discussion of divergence and convergence), and greater involvement of the session facilitator. Other constructs analyzed and discussed are: completeness, creativity, satisfaction, IS-user bonding, user expectations, users' mental models, JAD costs, group size, and planning activities.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectDissertations, Academicen_US
dc.subjectApplication softwareen_US
dc.subjectPsychology, Industrial.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineBusiness Administrationen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorGeorge, Joey F.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberNunamaker, Jr., Jay F.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberChen, Hsinchunen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberWhitney, Gretchenen_US
dc.identifier.proquest9202075en_US
dc.identifier.oclc711787757en_US
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