Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/185586
Title:
Philology as rhetoric in Emily Dickinson's poems.
Author:
Hallen, Cynthia Leah.
Issue Date:
1991
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Philology, or the love of words, is a source of power in Emily Dickinson's poems. Noah Webster's dictionary was a storehouse of philological knowledge and thus a major source of linguistic power for Dickinson. Her poems show that philology is an effective way to compose and interpret texts, and that paying attention to words is a source of rhetorical power for readers and writers today. The first six chapters of the dissertation feature aspects of Dickinson's philology from the perspective of nineteenth-century rhetoric: Definition, Music, Cohesion, Dictionary Use, and Etymology. Chapter One tells the story of Emily's "Lexicon" and "Noah's Ark." Chapter Two discusses definition as a rhetorical strategy and presents a definition of terms. Chapter Three explores music as rhetorical power in the themes, prosody, and sound patterns, syntax, and lexis of Dickinson's poems. The cohesion of Dickinson's lexical choices is the focus of Chapter Four. Chapter Five focuses more intently the role of the Lexicon in Dickinson's composing processes. The role of etymology in Webster's lexicography and in Dickinson's poetry is the subject of Chapter Six. Chapter Seven uses A. L. Becker's definitions of a new philology to discuss the function of philology in contemporary English studies.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
American literature
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
English; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Roen, Duane H.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titlePhilology as rhetoric in Emily Dickinson's poems.en_US
dc.creatorHallen, Cynthia Leah.en_US
dc.contributor.authorHallen, Cynthia Leah.en_US
dc.date.issued1991en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractPhilology, or the love of words, is a source of power in Emily Dickinson's poems. Noah Webster's dictionary was a storehouse of philological knowledge and thus a major source of linguistic power for Dickinson. Her poems show that philology is an effective way to compose and interpret texts, and that paying attention to words is a source of rhetorical power for readers and writers today. The first six chapters of the dissertation feature aspects of Dickinson's philology from the perspective of nineteenth-century rhetoric: Definition, Music, Cohesion, Dictionary Use, and Etymology. Chapter One tells the story of Emily's "Lexicon" and "Noah's Ark." Chapter Two discusses definition as a rhetorical strategy and presents a definition of terms. Chapter Three explores music as rhetorical power in the themes, prosody, and sound patterns, syntax, and lexis of Dickinson's poems. The cohesion of Dickinson's lexical choices is the focus of Chapter Four. Chapter Five focuses more intently the role of the Lexicon in Dickinson's composing processes. The role of etymology in Webster's lexicography and in Dickinson's poetry is the subject of Chapter Six. Chapter Seven uses A. L. Becker's definitions of a new philology to discuss the function of philology in contemporary English studies.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectAmerican literatureen_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineEnglishen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorRoen, Duane H.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberFleming, Margaret B.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberWillard, Thomasen_US
dc.identifier.proquest9200036en_US
dc.identifier.oclc705393572en_US
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