Inequality at work: A comparison of underemployment and stratification between Mexican-origin and white workers.

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/185580
Title:
Inequality at work: A comparison of underemployment and stratification between Mexican-origin and white workers.
Author:
De Anda, Roberto Moreno.
Issue Date:
1991
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The major theme of this study is to demonstrate the importance of including the underemployed in assessments of ethnic stratification. Particularly, it is argued that this approach presents a more balanced evaluation of the degree of labor force integration of the Mexican origin population. Empirically, the prevalence of underemployment among Mexican origin and whites workers for the 1976-1987 period is analyzed. During this 12-year span, the level of underemployment for Mexican workers increased from 32 percent to 42 percent, while the white level fluctuated around 21 percent. Models to determine the causes of underemployment were estimated using logistic regression. The models evaluate the relative importance of human capital variables (e.g., age and schooling) and structural variables (e.g., occupation and industrial sector location) as determinants of underemployment. Results indicate that young, poorly educated Mexican origin workers are more vulnerable to underemployment than their white counterparts; that Mexicans incumbents in service and low-skill, blue-collar occupations are more susceptible to underemployment than whites in the same occupations; and that the risk of underemployment is greater for Mexicans than their white counterparts located in the periphery and trade sectors. It was also found that nativity status has no statistical effect on the propensity for underemployment. But Mexicans with limited English proficiency were more likely to be underemployed than their more English proficient peers. To gauge the effect of labor underutilization on ethnic inequality, the Mexican-white earnings differential is analyzed controlling for employment instability. Results show that employment instability exerts a heavy cost: Mexican men who experience employment instability earn 37 percent less than their adequately employed counterparts. Last, the underemployed should be included in ethnic stratification studies focusing on labor market outcomes because their exclusion provides a more conservative assessment of inequality. Data for the analyses come from the Current Population Survey and the 1976 Survey of Income and Education.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Mexicans -- Employment -- United States; Underemployment -- United States; Discrimination in employment -- United States.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Sociology; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Fligstein, Neil

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleInequality at work: A comparison of underemployment and stratification between Mexican-origin and white workers.en_US
dc.creatorDe Anda, Roberto Moreno.en_US
dc.contributor.authorDe Anda, Roberto Moreno.en_US
dc.date.issued1991en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe major theme of this study is to demonstrate the importance of including the underemployed in assessments of ethnic stratification. Particularly, it is argued that this approach presents a more balanced evaluation of the degree of labor force integration of the Mexican origin population. Empirically, the prevalence of underemployment among Mexican origin and whites workers for the 1976-1987 period is analyzed. During this 12-year span, the level of underemployment for Mexican workers increased from 32 percent to 42 percent, while the white level fluctuated around 21 percent. Models to determine the causes of underemployment were estimated using logistic regression. The models evaluate the relative importance of human capital variables (e.g., age and schooling) and structural variables (e.g., occupation and industrial sector location) as determinants of underemployment. Results indicate that young, poorly educated Mexican origin workers are more vulnerable to underemployment than their white counterparts; that Mexicans incumbents in service and low-skill, blue-collar occupations are more susceptible to underemployment than whites in the same occupations; and that the risk of underemployment is greater for Mexicans than their white counterparts located in the periphery and trade sectors. It was also found that nativity status has no statistical effect on the propensity for underemployment. But Mexicans with limited English proficiency were more likely to be underemployed than their more English proficient peers. To gauge the effect of labor underutilization on ethnic inequality, the Mexican-white earnings differential is analyzed controlling for employment instability. Results show that employment instability exerts a heavy cost: Mexican men who experience employment instability earn 37 percent less than their adequately employed counterparts. Last, the underemployed should be included in ethnic stratification studies focusing on labor market outcomes because their exclusion provides a more conservative assessment of inequality. Data for the analyses come from the Current Population Survey and the 1976 Survey of Income and Education.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectMexicans -- Employment -- United Statesen_US
dc.subjectUnderemployment -- United Statesen_US
dc.subjectDiscrimination in employment -- United States.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineSociologyen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorFligstein, Neilen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberShockey, Jamesen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberSchwartzman, Kathleenen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberMoll, Luis C.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest9200031en_US
dc.identifier.oclc703266810en_US
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