AMERICAN INDIAN STUDENTS IN HIGHER EDUCATION: FACTORS RELATED TO THEIR UNDERGRADUATE COLLEGE ENTRANCE.

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/185570
Title:
AMERICAN INDIAN STUDENTS IN HIGHER EDUCATION: FACTORS RELATED TO THEIR UNDERGRADUATE COLLEGE ENTRANCE.
Author:
FOX, MARY JO TIPPECONNIC.
Issue Date:
1982
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The purposes of this study were to identify selected characteristics of American Indian entering freshman students and to identify selected factors related to the increasing number entering two- or four-year colleges or universities. In addition, the identified characteristics and factors were compared with a sample of Mexican American/Chicanos and in selected areas with other white/Caucasians to determine similarities and differences between the three groups. Six research questions were formulated and examined to achieve the purposes of this study. The data were extracted from the annual freshmen surveys for fall 1966, 1972, and 1978 of the Cooperative Institutional Research Project (CIRP), and the National Longitudinal Study of the High School Class of 1972 (NLS). The variables selected and analyzed from the annual freshmen surveys were sex, age, high-school rank, concern about finances, enrollment status, need for academic help, probable major field of study, probable careers, highest degree planned, type of institutions attended, control of institutions attended, regions of institutions attended, and reasons for selecting a particular institution. NLS variables used were community orientation, family orientation, work orientation, self-concept, locus of control, socioeconomic status, sources of planned and used financial aid, and information on continuing college students. The statistical procedures used to analyze the data were frequency counts, percentages, and the t-test of significance. The data indicated that changes had occurred between 1966 and 1978 on selected characteristics of American Indian entering freshman students. The comparisons of American Indian with Mexican American/Chicano and/or white/Caucasian entering freshman students showed more similarities than differences on selected characteristics, particularly in 1978. The findings showed community orientation, family orientation, and work orientation were not associated with entrance into college for the three groups studied. Whereas, self-concept, locus of control, and socioeconomic status were associated with entrance into college for the three groups. Sources of financial aid varied for each group, and at least 70 percent of all students from each group continued in college. Further study is recommended on American Indians at all levels of higher education because data is not plentiful.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Indians of North America -- Education (Higher); College freshmen -- United States.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Study of Higher Education; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleAMERICAN INDIAN STUDENTS IN HIGHER EDUCATION: FACTORS RELATED TO THEIR UNDERGRADUATE COLLEGE ENTRANCE.en_US
dc.creatorFOX, MARY JO TIPPECONNIC.en_US
dc.contributor.authorFOX, MARY JO TIPPECONNIC.en_US
dc.date.issued1982en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe purposes of this study were to identify selected characteristics of American Indian entering freshman students and to identify selected factors related to the increasing number entering two- or four-year colleges or universities. In addition, the identified characteristics and factors were compared with a sample of Mexican American/Chicanos and in selected areas with other white/Caucasians to determine similarities and differences between the three groups. Six research questions were formulated and examined to achieve the purposes of this study. The data were extracted from the annual freshmen surveys for fall 1966, 1972, and 1978 of the Cooperative Institutional Research Project (CIRP), and the National Longitudinal Study of the High School Class of 1972 (NLS). The variables selected and analyzed from the annual freshmen surveys were sex, age, high-school rank, concern about finances, enrollment status, need for academic help, probable major field of study, probable careers, highest degree planned, type of institutions attended, control of institutions attended, regions of institutions attended, and reasons for selecting a particular institution. NLS variables used were community orientation, family orientation, work orientation, self-concept, locus of control, socioeconomic status, sources of planned and used financial aid, and information on continuing college students. The statistical procedures used to analyze the data were frequency counts, percentages, and the t-test of significance. The data indicated that changes had occurred between 1966 and 1978 on selected characteristics of American Indian entering freshman students. The comparisons of American Indian with Mexican American/Chicano and/or white/Caucasian entering freshman students showed more similarities than differences on selected characteristics, particularly in 1978. The findings showed community orientation, family orientation, and work orientation were not associated with entrance into college for the three groups studied. Whereas, self-concept, locus of control, and socioeconomic status were associated with entrance into college for the three groups. Sources of financial aid varied for each group, and at least 70 percent of all students from each group continued in college. Further study is recommended on American Indians at all levels of higher education because data is not plentiful.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectIndians of North America -- Education (Higher)en_US
dc.subjectCollege freshmen -- United States.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineStudy of Higher Educationen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.identifier.proquest8217413en_US
dc.identifier.oclc681753034en_US
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